The Winners: Packed To The Rafters on Seven at 8.30pm averaged 1.868 million viewers, Find My Family was second with 1.827 million. The Zoo returned to 7.30pm for Seven and did better than I thought it would, averaging a large 1.716 million. Seven News was fourth with 1.406 million, Today Tonight fifth with 1.305 million. Home And Away was sixth with 1.242 million and Ten’s NCIS was seventh with 1.239 million. All Saints was eighth for Seven at 9.30pm with 1.205 million and Nine’s 7pm repeat of Two And A Half Men averaged 1.205 million. Nine News was tenth with 1.164 million, the 7pm ABC News was next with 1.105 million and A Current Affair was twelfth with 1.033 million. Two And A Half Men at 8.30pm averaged 1.003 million and the 9pm episode, 1.001 million for 14th and the final spot in the millionaire’s club last night. Ten’s 7.30 pm episode of The Simpsons averaged 999,000; the 9.30pm episode of 20 to 1 on Nine, 970,000 and Rush on Ten at 9.30 pm, 969,000.

The Losers: Chopping Block, 825,000. Viewers seem unhappy with the stupid format where there has to be a winner, but that reflects the blokey Nine culture where there’s always a winner and a loser and winners are grinners. So far, Nine is the loser, and so is the producer, Granada. Last night, both eateries, Emads and Gloria’s deserved to both win in someway. It’s a pity that Nine can’t see that. Kenny’s World on Ten at 8pm: 773,000.

News & CA: Seven News again won nationally and in every market but Melbourne. Today Tonight won everywhere. The 7.30 Report averaged 841,000 (Was Kerry O’Brien just searching for cheap and easy political points last night? Wayne Swan looked unruffled, so unlike him). Lateline, 213,000, Lateline Business, 172,000 (Figures still good for info on the financial system and shares late at night). Ten News, 875,000, the Late News/Sports Tonight, 443,000. SBS News 178,000 at 6.30pm, 256,000 for Insight, 7.30pm, 137,000 for the Late News Edition, 137,000. 7am Sunrise on Seven, 338,000, 7am Today, 309,000.

The Stats: Seven won All People and everything else with a share of 36.2% (35.7% last week), from Nine with 23.8% (24.8%), Ten with 21.5% (21.8%), the ABC with 14.3% (13.8%) and SBS with 4.2% (4.4%). Seven won all five metro markets and leads the week 31.8% to 26.8% for Nine. In regional areas a bigger win for Seven with Prime/7Qld with 38.1%, WIN/NBN on 21.8%, Southern Cross (Ten) with 21.5%, the ABC with 13.6% and SBS with 5.0%.

Glenn Dyer’s comments: Seven is the only channel viewers like on Tuesday nights and last night was no different. No wonder Seven has just signed up for series two of Packed To The Rafters. Last night’s episode was solid and a real treat (You can’t go back was the theme). Rebecca Gibney is the star of the program, the core. She’s in danger of following Lorraine Bayley and her character from The Sullivans (Grace Sullivan) down the isle to national ‘Mum’ icon status. Ms Gibney has had plenty of solid roles (Halifax on Ten, more recently), but nothing as solid and central as this one is turning into. The gap between Sunrise (338,000) on Seven and Today (309,000 and just three spots on the top 100 list) one of the narrowest yet. A change approaches?

Tonight, Nine drops The Mentalist into 8.30pm replacing Fringe. Will Mentalist repeat its Sunday night success against another solid US cop show in Criminal Minds? If it does Nine will do well, if it doesn’t Nine won’t and 2009 will look that little bit more shaky for them. Simon Baker though has a lot of appeal. Spicks and Specks on the ABC at 8.30 pm will provide some opposition: House on Ten in the same slot won’t, it’s dying. Jamie Oliver’s Ministry of Food is a waste of time for Australian viewers, Stupid Stupid Man on the ABC at 9pm shows why Foxtel, when it puts its mind to it, can do good TV outside of cheap sports coverage. Newstopia on SBS at 10pm, please.

Source: OzTAM, TV Networks reports.

Peter Fray

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