John McCain’s blunders last week on the global financial meltdown should have been “the end of the McCain campaign”, but it  failed to translate into an advantage for Barack Obama, writes Christopher Hitchens for Slate.

“There are three possible reasons for such a huge failure on Barack Obama’s part. The first, and the most widely canvassed, is that he is too nice, too innocent, too honest, and too decent to get down in the arena and trade bloody thrusts with the right-wing enemy. (This is rapidly becoming the story line that will achieve mythic status, along with allegations of racial and religious rumor-mongering, if he actually loses in November.) The second is that crisis and difficulty, at home and abroad, sometimes make electors slightly more likely to trust the existing establishment, or some version of it, than any challenger or newcomer, however slight. The third is that Obama does not, and perhaps even cannot, represent “change” for the very simple reason that the Democrats are a status quo party.”

Read the full story here.

Peter Fray

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