The Winners. Packed To The Rafters was the top with 1.895 million, Find My Family at 8pm was second with 1.815 million, continuing to show that a simple idea, done well, can rate its socks off. RSPCA Animal Rescue was third with 1.813 million, which would be close to an all time high.

Seven News was 4th with 1.582 million, Today Tonight was next with 1.441 million and Home And Away was 6th with 1.376 million at 7pm. Ten’s NCIS was seventh with 1.266 million at 8.30pm, while the ABC News was next with 1.246 million (and ahead of Nine News in the rankings). Nineth was Nine’s repeat of Two And A half Men at 7pm with 1.221 million. Nine News was 10th with 1.212 million, All Saints won the 9.30pm slot with 1.212 million and Nine’s 7.30pm program, Wipeout averaged 1.170 million. As Current Affair averaged 1.131 million (around 200,000 down from Monday night!), Two and A Half Men averaged 1.052 million at 8.30pm and 1.017 million at 9pm for Nine in 15th.

Ten’s 9.30pm program, Rush, averaged 1.014 million in 16th and The 7.30 Report averaged 1 million for 17th, rising because Top Gear wasn’t on SBS. Two and A half Men topped all the male demos, Packed To The Rafters the female demos and the combined demos. So female viewers obviously won the night’s battle over the remote because Rafters was 600,000 viewers clear of Two And A half Men. It proves once again, if you can make a good program for Australian female viewers, you will strike ratings gold.

The Losers. Nine and Ten last night. Just not competitive, whereas some ABC programs were: Two in the Top End, 887,000 on the ABC at 8pm, far more interesting about two blokes than Nine’s Two And A Half Men. Grand Designs on the ABC at 8.30pm, ditto about being more interesting (if you weren’t Packed To The Rafters). Taken Out on Ten at 7pm, of course. 507,000. Soon it will be just the immediate family of the contestants, cast and crew and a few executives at Ten and Fremantle watching. Is it true that Nine and Charlie Sheen want it to remain on air?

News & CA. Seven News and Today Tonight won nationally and in every metro market. The 7.30 Report showed why concentrating on the events of the day matter, especially in Sydney. Yes, it finished 131,000 viewers behind ACA nationally, but it had more viewers in Sydney: 320,000 vs ACA, 307,000. Red Kerry’s approach to the political issue of the day, Malcolm Turnbull’s ascension to the top of the Liberal Party worked in Sydney, but not in Melbourne where ACA had 401,000 viewers and The 7.30 Report just 289,000. Lateline averaged 246,000, Lateline Business, 195,000 (a beneficiary of all the financial turmoil); Ten News, 833,000, the late News/Sports Tonight, 501,000. SBS News at 6.30pm, 221,000, Insight, 287,000, the 9.30pm SBS News at 9.30pm, 155,000. Sunrise, 363,000, Today 300,000.

The Stats. Seven again won easily with daylight second. Seven had a share in all people, 6pm to midnight of 34.1% (34.6%) from Nine with 24.9% (25.5%), Ten third with 20.9% (20.2%), the ABC with 16.0% (15.4%) and SBS with 4.1% (4.3%). Seven won all five metro markets and leads the week 30.2% to 25.8%.

Glenn Dyer’s comments. The TV ratings battle for the year is over if the Seven Network continues to wreak havoc on its opposition as it has done for successive Monday and Tuesday nights since the Olympics. In fact it is making a mockery of claims from its rivals, led by Nine, that Seven had nothing after the Olympics. The TV industry is full of upbeat and wild over the top predictions and justifications, but TV viewers are the best judges and they are giving the year to Seven. Nine and Ten are helpless as they watch the good gains from the first half slip away night by night. And the good thing about it is that Seven is doing this with local productions, many of them “original” in that they stick to formats or tried and true formulae, but they employ Australians and show our way of life.

Source: OzTAM, TV Networks reports.

Peter Fray

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