Electric Bikes Sell as Gas Climbs. The surging cost of gasoline and a desire for a greener commute are turning more people to electric bikes as an unconventional form of transportation. They function like a typical two-wheeler but with a battery-powered assist, and bike dealers, riders and experts say they are flying off the racks. — Time

Who recharged the electric car? In the midst of the mayhem that is the Democratic National Convention in Denver, 10 electric vehicles can be found zipping along the streets of Denver or idling at the corner of Speer and Champa. Boulder County, Colo. delegate Nate Vanderschaaf brought them to Denver as part of the Electric Vehicle Rolling Showcase — a personal effort to leverage his position as a delegate to bring attention to (and free rides in) electric vehicles at the convention. — Grist

‘Honolulu Declaration’ Tackles Ocean Acidification. Ocean scientists from around the world have agreed to a framework to save the oceans from one of the great sleeper environmental issues of our day: Ocean acidification. Like global warming, ocean acidification is caused primarily by human emissions of carbon dioxide. In the atmosphere, that carbon helps to trap heat near the Earth’s surface. In the oceans, it makes the water more acidic. — The Daily Green

Structures Made from Trees, without the Cutting-Down Part. Using trees to make stuff isn’t a new idea…in fact it is one of the oldest. Also not new is the idea of shaping trees into objects. But there is a project underway that puts a whole new twist, literally, on the idea of making structures from trees. The novelty of it is that the trees will be grown in the shape desired – like the ultimate topiary, only useful. Researchers from Tel Aviv University and the company Plantware are partnering up to grow structures from trees on a commercial scale – structures including bus shelters, playgrounds, and even houses. — Ecogeek

Peter Fray

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