Since we’re back on the subject of the ABC logo: in discussion with a friend who works regularly for the ABC (behind a camera), I’m told that the affectionate in-house term for the “venerable lissajous” (Denise Marcos, yesterday, comments), is the “the turd”.

Just a quick note regarding your story on Wikileaks, it appears that all that has been done is the record removed from DNS. The site is still available at http://88.80.13.160/ .

Re. ” Tips and rumours” (yesterday, item 9). Crikey published: “Which high paid, senior federal public servant travels each week between Canberra, where he works, and his home and family interstate? He clocks up a lot of airfares, FFs and taxi fares. Who foots the bill? Would he be defensive about answering such questions?” Oh, that’s easy. That would be Dr Steven Gumley of the DMO whose salary is higher than even the Secretary of Defence.

In regard to the Fairfax/News ACCC issue — did the VACC tell you how many Carsales shares they and their members own? Could be they don’t want the impending Carsales listing and the likely rewards spoiled. Most dealers despise Carsales and its majority owner PBL way more than Drive and Carsguide.

Check out the battle for power between Minister Emerson and Tanner over deregulation. Senior officers at the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research are sitting back and watching.

Channel Nine seem to have given up on Sunday. Type ” Sunday program” into Google and you get a screed on Jim Waley. Go to the site and they still feature a photo of Ray Martin. These sort of things often happen to organisations that aren’t that web savvy. But to what was once Australia’s number one news and current affairs network? Looks like no-one at Nine cares anymore.

Following on from previous stories about the chronic shortages in Australian Air Traffic Control. Brisbane Tower is now also at dangerously low levels of staffing. Between now and the end of March they are already 58 shifts short of full staffing, and already in April there are 37 shifts unable to be filled. Looks like Melbourne and Launceston Towers aren’t the only ones that may close in the near future. When will this all end?

Qantas announces a huge profit extolling how well they are doing with keeping jet fuel costs under control. (Also showing some interesting currency exchange benefits from their fuel). Strange they thought they needed to increase the fuel surcharge yet again in early January. Not more than a couple of weeks after they were doing so well.

In Wollongong last night a public meeting hosted by South Coast Labor Council. The chair, Arthur Rorris, noted the non-attendance by the five invited local MPs (Kiama MP Matt Brown, Heathcote MP Paul McLeay, Wollongong MP Noreen Hay, Keira MP David Campbell, Shellharbour MP Lylea McMahon) was a slap in the face. Former MPs Col Markham, Bob Harrison and Stuart West (ex Cunningham, Federal) all spoke passionately against the scheme. A letter opposing the scheme from Ian West was read out. The Illawarra meeting moved the following unanimous resolutions: RESOLUTION 1: That this meeting of concerned citizens in the Illawarra condemns the electricity privatisation scheme of the NSW government and Treasurer Costa. The meeting supports the Unions NSW Rally on Tuesday 26. The meeting agrees to form People Power Illawarra with the objective of mobalising the community against privatisation of natural monopolies and targeting state MPs. RESOLUTION 2: The meeting calls for the immediate resignation of the NSW Treasurer. RESOLUTION 3: The meeting expresses its disgust that none of the 5 Illawarra MPs have attended and in not attending have demonstrated their contempt for the people of the Illawarra. RESOLUTION 4: The meeting notes the Government has no mandate to sell this public asset. In closing, the chair remarked on the union movement’s stunning ‘Your rights at work’ campaign, saying this was a chance for ALP and union members to connect again and stick together.

Former Keating Treasurer Ralph Willis has an interesting Wikipedia page.

Peter Fray

Get your first 12 weeks of Crikey for $12.

Without subscribers, Crikey can’t do what it does. Fortunately, our support base is growing.

Every day, Crikey aims to bring new and challenging insights into politics, business, national affairs, media and society. We lift up the rocks that other news media largely ignore. Without your support, more of those rocks – and the secrets beneath them — will remain lodged in the dirt.

Join today and get your first 12 weeks of Crikey for just $12.

 

Peter Fray
Editor-in-chief of Crikey

JOIN NOW