A few special picks from the campaign rounds. Feel the love.

  • Baby Love. Slate‘s Darren Garnick was a man with a mission: to have his baby Dahlia photographed with every presidential candidate (and Chuck Norris). To enhance her prospects, Garnick played to the occasion, decking Dahlia out in a “Black Power” bib for Obama and a Mitt ’08 sticker for Romney. So who is the best baby handler? It was a fairly even split between Obama and McCain. John Edwards, meanwhile, was a dud, failing to make even the slightest mention of her cuteness. Follow the links for a very presidential photo album.
  • Obama Love. One journalist admits it’s hard to stay objective covering Obama. Republicans currently in process of patenting Charisma Shield.
  • Chuck hearts Huckabee. To date, he’s lent his butt-kicking seal of approval to Mountain Dew and Total Gym. Now Chuck Norris has a new fave: Republican hopeful Mike Huckabee. For those who haven’t seen their joint ad, it’s a delightfully camp effort from a couple of Christians.
  • Authentic tears? Ask an expert. With a view to covering Hillary’s “tears” — more accurately described as a facial scrunch — from every angle, Politico turned to an expert, David Givens, director of the Center for Non Verbal Studies in Washington state and author of the book, “CRIME SIGNALS: How to Spot a Criminal Before You Become a Victim,” to test whether Hill’s sobs were croc tears. He says no, Clinton appeared genuine. “Givens — who studies facial expression, body movement and gestures — said the catch in Clinton’s voice, the stuttering, the pauses, the hemming-and-hawing and other reactions were all involuntary cues as to the senator’s genuine mood.”

Peter Fray

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