Insuring against climate change: Up to 80% of the value of a home could be lost if insurers decided the risks of flooding had increased substantially. The report concludes that climate change has already had an impact around the world and that hundreds of millions of people face water and food shortages, extreme weather events and disease, with the poorest to be worst hit. — The Sydney Morning Herald

Selling forests for salt n sugar: Vast tracts of the world’s second-largest rainforest have been obtained by a small group of European and American industrial logging companies in return for minimal taxes and gifts of salt, sugar and tools, a two-year investigation will disclose today. — The Guardian

How to combat eco-anxiety: Melissa Pickett, an eco-therapist with a practice in Santa Fe, says she sees between 40 to 80 eco-anxious patients a month. They complain of panic attacks, loss of appetite, irritability and unexplained bouts of weakness, sleeplessness and “buzzing,” described as an eerie feeling that their cells are twitching. Pickett’s remedies include telling patients to carry natural objects, like certain minerals, for a period of weeks. — The Philadelphia Inquirer

Japan teaches China how to go green: In Beijing, the air quality is not satisfactory on more than 100 days a year. In fact, on the day in February I visited Beijing to look into the environmental situation, the air was so thick with photochemical smog that I found myself coughing as I walked the streets. — China Daily

Keeping salmon safe: A federal appeals court Monday strongly rejected the Bush administration’s novel 2004 plan for making Columbia Basin hydroelectric dams safe for salmon, saying it used “sleight of hand” and violated the Endangered Species Act. — Sign on SanDiego