Yesterday, women across the nation did exactly what Target wanted — hustling and fighting, in front of the cameras, for Stella McCartney’s range.

You can’t buy that kind of publicity. And to a large extent, Target didn’t. If you’ve got a juicy enough angle, the media will be your bitch for free. And as this article shows, Crikey isn’t immune.

By this morning, Target’s Stella McCartney range had clocked an impressive number of media mentions Australia-wide over the last seven days: 66 press mentions, 71 TV mentions and 184 radio mentions. By 12pm today, 24 Stella for Target items were already up for sale on eBay.

Perhaps Stella McCartney should have held out for more than the $1.27 million she received for designing the one-off range.

Did the clothe-hungry hordes have time to assess the quality of the designs before they snaffled them? Is the clothing actually any good? To some extent, it’s a side issue. For Target, this is about branding, not clothing. The store shifted to a more upmarket space last year with collections by Australian designers Alice McCall, Tina Kalivas and TL Wood. McCartney is another high class notch on the belt.

As retail commentator Rob Lake noted to Crikey yesterday, Coles, free from the shackles of Myer, is looking to fill the void. So should Myer be worried?

Retail analyst Grant Sagliari from Commsec told ABC’s AM yesterday: “Well I think as Target continues to cater for the more aspirational consumer and move itself upmarket, well clearly that would close some positioning gap with Myer. Whether it would be worried or not I think it’s going down its own track and pursuing its own strategies.”