With news this week that Georgina Downer is joining the family firm and Patrick Keating has been adjudicating swimsuit competitions, politicians’ children have been in the spotlight. Which led us to wonder, what’s happened to all the little people we’ve watched grow up in voter-friendly family shots?

Well, they’re bigger. And a surprising number of them seem to have been hit with the pretty stick. On the other hand, an unsurprising number of them have become lawyers. Here’s what some famous polkids are up to now:

Julia Baird — working as a journalist for Newsweek in New York

Michael Baird — running in the NSW state election for the Liberal Party in the seat of Manly

Kate Beahan, daughter of former WA Senator Michael Beahan — Actor, currently launching her acting career in Hollywood

Hannah Beazley — runs a popular blog spot with husband Andrew Canion called Two Sitting Ducks

Angela Bishop — entertainment feature reporter for Channel Ten. The thinking woman’s Richard Wilkins

James Button — Europe correspondent for The Age in London

Seb Costello — student professional communication at Melbourne’s RMIT, breakfast host at youth radio network, SYN FM

Georgina Downer — graduate trainee at the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Steve Hawke — children’s book author. He just published Barefoot Kids which tracks the life of five cousins growing up in the Kimberley

Phoebe Fraser — formerly CARE Australia’s Communications Director, now undertaking a Masters degree and looking after her children

Carmen Fraser, granddaughter of Malcolm Fraser — “a singer, songwriter, pianist and breath of fresh air” according to her website; she’s more widely recognised as a country singer.

Ben Gray, son of former Tasmanian premier Robin Gray — head of Australian operations for Texas Pacific Group, private equity behemoth in consortium offering $11.1 billion for Qantas

Victoria Hill — actor, about to appear as the older woman who chases after Daniel Radcliffe (Harry Potter) in The December Boys, played Lady Macbeth in recent Australian film remake of the Shakespearean tragedy.

Tim Howard — Channel 7 strategist, dating FHM alumnus Sarah Mackintosh

Melanie Howard-McDonald — former lawyer with Clayton Utz in Sydney (like Dad was), now works as a lawyer for Vodafone

Richard Howard — consultant in Washington, former White House intern who also worked at law firm Clayton Utz (like Dad did) 

Katherine Keating — Former adviser to former NSW Minister for Infrastructure, Craig Knowles, now works for political advisory firm Fortier Consulting Group in Woolloomooloo

Patrick Keating — A-lister according to the Daily Tele along with Amber, his property mogul and model wife. Last spotted judging bikini contest at his local watering hole, property-related incidents seem to cause him constant grief

Angus Kennett — bar co-owner (9t4 in Richmond, Melbourne) and fashion model, nominated one of Melbourne’s 25 s-xiest people by The Age in 2004 

Ross Kennett — co-owner and manager of 9t4 bar

Julian McMahon — Hollywood heartthrob, star of US drama Nip/Tuck, Golden Globe nominee

Simon Moore (son of former federal Coalition minister John Moore) — chief of Australian office of US private equity firm Carlyle

Ann Peacock —  General Manager of Marketing Communications at Crown Limited, married to Michael Kroger, Victorian Liberal Party powerbroker

Caroline Peacock — Adelaide-based radio producer, married to shock jock and cash-for-commenter Jeremy Cordeaux

Jessica Rudd — lawyer with Brisbane law firm Thynne & Macartney

Nicholas Rudd — student of Law and Chinese at Griffith University

Caitlin Ruddock — lecturer in accounting at University of NSW

Any of these CVs out of date? Any contributions to make? Email [email protected].

Peter Fray

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