Climate change resets ‘Doomsday Clock’: Experts assessing the dangers posed to civilisation have added climate change to the prospect of nuclear annihilation as the greatest threats to humankind.  As a result, the group has moved the minute hand on its famous ‘Doomsday Clock’ two minutes closer to midnight. The concept timepiece now stands at five minutes to the hour. — ABC News Online

Coffee to kill endangered animals: Coffee drinkers have been unknowingly consuming a brew made from beans grown illegally in one of the world’s most important natural parks, a report revealed today. The 324,000 hectare Bukit Barisan Selatan national park in Sumatra, Indonesia is a Unesco world heritage site and one of the few protected areas where three endangered or critically endangered species – Sumatran tigers, elephants and rhinos – coexist. — The Guardian

The warming of Greenland: Maps of the region show a mountainous peninsula covered with glaciers. Now, where the maps showed only ice, a band of fast-flowing seawater [runs] between a newly exposed shoreline and the aquamarine-blue walls of a retreating ice shelf. — The New York Times

The South Island kokako is ‘officially extinct’, well maybe: Conservation officials yesterday formally declared the South Island kokako extinct, saying there had been no confirmed sightings of the bird for more than 40 years. But Ron Nilsson, of Christchurch, has spent more than 20 years searching for the South Island kokako, which he says he has heard up to 100 times and seen once. — New Zealand Herald

Science and religion join forces over climate change: Laying down their swords over how we came to exist, leaders from scientific and evangelical communities in the US joined forces today in an unprecedented effort to protect what we have. — New Scientist

Peter Fray

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