Pistes feel the heat of climate change: Some of Europe’s best-known ski resorts could be ruined by global warming, a report by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, warned today. In what is claimed to be the first study of its kind, the study estimated that a 2C increase in temperatures by 2050 would reduce by 40% the number of slopes with enough snow to ski. Guardian

Public begins to notice climate change: Scientists say 2006 may have been the year when the public at large finally embraced the idea that the Earth’s climate is, indeed, warming. In the end, it may not have been the pronouncements of scientists and policymakers that ultimately proved convincing, but something more tangible and immediate: the weird weather. RadioFreeEurope 

Attenborough urges “moral change”: Television naturalist Sir David Attenborough has called for a “moral change” among energy consumers to cut waste and reduce pollution. He told the Commons environment committee there was “no question” that global warming would worsen. BBC News

NZ’s plan to maximise efficiency: A detailed action plan to maximise energy efficiency and renewable energy in New Zealand was launched by the government today for public discussion. The draft New Zealand Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy proposes detailed actions to achieve energy savings in sectors such as homes, products, industry and vehicles. Scoop.co.nz

Cars and cows biggest global warming culprits: If you’re worried about global warming or water pollution, you can blame cars and factories, the White House, and the oil companies. Or you can blame cows and pigs …  “The livestock sector emerges as one of the top two or three most significant contributors to the most serious environmental problems, at every scale from local to global.” ABC News (US)

Extremes of weather here to stay says PM: Prime Minister John Howard has embraced a key climate change forecast, warning Australians to prepare for more extreme weather events like the current bushfires. The Age

Peter Fray

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