Wrong sort of court time for Williams sisters: It’s been a while since we’ve seen the Williams sisters dominating tennis courts. Now they’re gracing a different kind of court. The sisters are being sued for breach of contract over a 2001 “Battle of the S-xes” exhibition. It seems that Venus and Serena’s father talked contracts with the promoters, but the sisters say he had no right to be operating on their behalf as IMG handles all their deals. Serena also denied ever seeing a contract with a Serena Williams signature, which may or may not have been in her handwriting. Venus just shrugged that she wasn’t into the whole idea, telling the court: “I didn’t get involved. That wasn’t my thing. I’m a professional women’s tennis player. I want to play serious tennis.”

Beijing’s bargain tickets! All the Chinese Olympic Committee needs is one of those dodgy late-night TV campaigns for their bargain basement price tickets: “Wanna ticket for the 2008 Olympics? Out they go! At never to be repeated prices! Crazy, crazy, crazy! Hu Jintao has gone completely mad! Cuckoo! Cuckoo!” It’s all true. To make the Games experience vaguely affordable for everyday Chinese folk, prices will start at roughly $AUD5. But keep in mind that the average Chinese rural worker might make less than $AUD500 per year. Beijing urban workers apparently average more than $AUD400 per month so tickets scale accordingly, with the top tickets (best seats in the house, opening ceremony) likely to retail for roughly $AUD700.

Kronk Gym KO’ed by pipe robbery: The legendary Kronk boxing gym, in Detroit, has closed for good. Home to more than 25 world champions over the years, including such boxing legends as Oscar De La Hoya, Thomas Hearns and Evander Holyfield, it was finally shut after thieves stole copper pipes, cutting off the water. Emanuel Steward, the gym’s owner, had been trying to keep the boxing shrine open despite the recreation centre it was part of closing down. As Roberto Duran might have said: “No mas”.

Peter Fray

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