Climate change pioneer visits Sydney: Professor Jorgen Randers was one of the authors of The Limits to Growth, the controversial study which pioneered the climate change debate as far back as 1972. Its conclusion, broadly, that if the use of land, fossil fuels, water and other resources went on growing, those resources could eventually run out. — ABC Online

Britain’s waters already damaged by climate change : The effect of climate change and global warming is having a significant impact upon Britain’s seas and the marine life contained within, a government report today warns. Following on from the Stern Review…the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) today said that the commercial productivity of British waters was already being damaged. — In The News

Scientists find climate change extinction is happening now: No matter where they look, scientists are finding that global warming is already killing species—and at a much faster rate than had originally been predicted. — National Geographic

Lovelock predicts planetary wipe-out: Controversial scientist James Lovleock, who angered climate scientists with his Gaia theory of a living planet and then alienated environmentalists by backing nuclear power, has said that temperature rises of 8C are already built into the earth, and that efforts to curb it are morally commendable, but essentially a waste of time. — ABCNewsOnline 

Global warming has its day in court: It has not been too often – in the courts, at least – that the Bush administration has shrugged its shoulders and claimed that it is powerless to act. But that’s exactly what top federal officials will be arguing in the Supreme Court on Wednesday in possibly the most important case litigated yet over global warming. — US News & World Report

Decision day on Earth: Today one the most important decisions about the planet’s future for years to come will be made. José Manuel Barroso, the President of the European Commission, will announce the caps on emissions that it will impose on its member states from 2008 to 2012. — Times Online

Peter Fray

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