Jane Nethercote writes:


When the BBC’s News 24 channel wanted an IT expert to comment on the recent Apple v Apple decision, it got the wrong Guy. Literally.

Poor Guy Goma was thrust into the spotlight when he was mistaken as Guy
Kewney, an IT expert. He ended up on
air, trying desperately to explain the ramifications of the Apple court
case while
attempting not to look like a deer in the headlights (for footage, click here). The Daily Mail was quick to post a transcript of the interview with put-upon presenter Karen Bowerman:

KB: It does really seem the way the music
industry’s progressing now that people want to go onto the website and
download music.

Mr Goma: Exactly you can go everywhere on the cyber
cafe and you can take, you can go easy. It is going to be an easy way
for everyone to get something to the internet

How did this happen? It was a classic case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Mr Goma, a
Business Studies graduate from the Congo, was sitting in BBC
reception because he was applying for a high level IT job with the
broadcaster. The mix-up occurred when a producer went to collect the
real expert from the wrong reception in BBC Television Centre in West
London, reports BBC News.

The
producer asked for Guy Kewney, editor of Newswireless.net. After being pointed in Mr Goma’s direction by a receptionist,
the producer – who had seen a photo of the real expert – checked: “Are you Guy
Kewney?” The economics and business studies graduate answered in the
affirmative and was whisked up to the studio. Kewney is Anglo-Saxon with a beard. Goma is not.

Apparently the unflappable Mr Goma “assumed the whole thing was some
kind of initiation prank”, says the real Guy Kewney on his blog. “His own speciality is data cleansing, and (my
source inside the Beeb tells me) was ‘a little upset that nobody asked
him about his data cleansing expertise’.”

Peter Fray

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