The
Prime Minister’s visit to India this week is unlikely to capture the
attention of many people in either country, because “off the cricket
field, Australia’s presence in India is extremely limited,” says
Purnendra Jain in The Australian.
But pressure for the PM to lift the ban on Australian Uranium sales to
India will test our relationship with China and Japan, and as a result
Australia will face a real diplomatic dilemma. “Our foreign policy will
need much deeper and
long-term strategic thinking, particularly when power relations between
the world’s great players are constantly in transition and Asia is the
site of much of this action.”

In
Australia “few people, and fewer politicians, understand innovation and
even fewer understand why it is important to the rest of us,” says John
Legge in The Age – but Howard’s lack of support for innovation is a
“joke.” The Howard Government has chosen the low road from the start,
which has undeniably led to high growth, but will put us in hot water
when the credit runs out. “Australia under Howard is like a gambler
drawing a cash advance
on his credit card to feed the poker machines: fun while the credit
lasts, but not after that.”

“The tendency to shirk the burden of responsibility permeates our family rooms and our boardrooms,” says Patricia Dalton in The Washington Post.
High profile examples abound all through the media: just look at Dick
Cheney, or Enron chairman Kenneth Lay. “Allowing children to evade
responsibility may cost parents a lot. But
it’s nothing compared with the cost to their kids: misery that lasts a
lifetime.”

In
his attempt to try and pry back his popularity across America,
President Bush has been “looking a little wobbly to the gung-ho set”
lately – his role of playing the public defender has fallen by
wayside, says Andrew Sullivan in The Sunday Times.
Bush was taciturn on the Muslim cartoons and unusually quiet on the
Dubai ports deal. The Democrats could have a field day. “Think of this
as a possible campaign platform: get our troops out of Iraq and Arabs
out of our ports.” But if the Democrats don’t seize the opportunity,
then some Republicans will, and Bush won’t be able to stop them.

Worth reading Highly recommended

Peter Fray

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