It had to happen eventually – “AWB ‘fool’ is the first head to roll,” leads The Australian
this morning, reporting that besieged AWB head Andrew Lindberg has
finally resigned from his position atop the crumbling wheat board. The
board released a statement thanking Lindberg for “making this decision,
believing it to be in the best interests of the company.” His severance
pay has not been finalised yet, but will be publicly announced, um,
eventually. Expect outrage when it comes.

“It’s the Eddie show – and he’s locked in,” says this morning’s Sydney Morning Herald.
He’s ambitious, ubiquitous and now he’s the new head of Channel Nine.
And a base jumper who had to be rescued twice in four months has been
fined $1,000 for risking the safety of a person in a national park.
Police believe this is the first time the law, which encourages people
to act sensibly in national parks, has been used to prosecute someone.

And the Daily Tele’s
full of news about a possible Barbie and Ken reunion after the world’s
most famous (completely) plastic couple split a few years ago. With
sagging Barbie sales blamed for toy company Mattel’s poor performance,
Ken is buffed up and set to make a comeback “Ken has revamped his life
– mind, body and soul,” Hollywood stylist and Mattel consultant Phillip
Bloch said in a statement.

“Quite literally, Melbourne will not be the same without him,”
says The Age, in the paper’s low-key
front page spread
farewelling Eddie McGuire, who departs for Sydney
on Monday to take charge at Channel Nine. And there’s at leastone person
who’ll really miss him
.

Too bad. Looks like Health Minister Tony Abbott could lose his power
of veto over the abortion drug RU486, reportsThe Age, after the Senate voted
overwhelmingly in favour of giving the Therapeutic Goods Administration control
of the drug. It’s up to the House of Reps, now.

And Labor stalwart Simon Crean faces the fight of his
career, says the paper, with Martin Pakula, state secretary of Crean’s old
union, vying for his seat.

The Herald Sun
nudges aside the departing McGuire in favour of Tyler Fishlock on its front page, the Melbourne toddler who is learning to see the world
through his hands after doctors removed his remaining eye in a battle against a
rare genetic cancer.

A victim of the catastrophic 2003 bushfires is suing NSW
Rural Fire Service Commissioner Phil Koperberg personally for his losses,
reportsThe Canberra Times, claiming both
Koperberg and NSW showed negligence and a breach of statutory duty during the
fires.

Brisbane City Council is digging deep to remedy Southeast
Queensland’s worsening water crisis – it will spend up to $30 million going
underground to find a new source, reports the Courier-Mail.

And this morning’s Advertiser reports “Rann
steps on election gas,” with South Australian Premier Mike Rann going
on the offensive, deviating from script to present a “campaign-style”
speech to Adelaide business leaders highlighting jobs and the state’s
economic growth.

The West Australian
reports that nurses at Hakea Prison have walked off the job after
discovering a manager’s notebook with nasty comments about all but two
of the female nursing staff. The women were described as either a “lazy
sh*t”, “2 faced”, “rude”, “ignorant”, “unreliable”, “unprofessional” or
“not nice.”

“Honey … wake up, we’re about to crash,” leads this morning’s Northern Territory News,
reporting that a couple has been awarded $780,000 in damages after the
plane they were flying in crashed on the way to Darwin. The headline
comes from the fact that one of the victims, Mr Jeffs, who had been
sleeping, woke up and asked his wife: “Are we in Darwin?” She said:
“No, we’re going to crash.”

And the news can wait at The Mercury, its
front page revealing the secret behind the $30,000 winner of last week’s spectacular Fashions on the Field at Hobart’s
Elwick Race Course: she’s actually a German supermodel! Scandalous.

Peter Fray

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