Nick Place
at the Crikey sports desk
writes:

“I got fortunate, very fortunate,” Tiger Woods said with
commendable honesty after a club-throwing, tree-bashing, ball-spraying 18 holes
around the relatively benign Emirates course. But as is becoming the way of
things in the world of golf, Woods still found a way to win a tournament while
those around did their best to throw it away.

That’s a pretty neat
summary by The Guardian of Tiger
Woods winning his second tournament of the year yesterday. How many tournaments has he actually
contested in 2006? Two.

It doesn’t bode well
for those who would usurp the king. He won in San Diego last week, jumped
straight on a plane and covered 12 time zones to get to Dubai, staggered onto
that course and promptly won again, edging out another elite golfer in Ernie
Els in the play off.

If any professional
golfers are still able to sleep, let’s lay it on a little more. Woods
reportedly lost his way during the final round in Dubai and couldn’t hit a fairway to save himself.
Mid-round, he was on his way to the airport but then he managed to repair his
game.

“What did I do to fix
it? I got the club up a bit more, right on my left arm, got the club in front
of me, left hand with more loft coming through,” he told reporters afterwards.
He got things together in time to need a pair of birdies on the last two holes
to force a play-off so, yawn, he did.

Not surprisingly, the
world No.1 is happy with how this year is shaping. He entered San Diego fresh from the longest break of his career –
six weeks away from anything resembling golf. “I did have a few thoughts about
my golf swing but they were very brief thoughts. And I definitely didn’t touch
a club,” he told reporters in Dubai.

It seems to
have worked for him, even if he is winning ugly. USA
Today
reported Woods as saying:

“My list of
things I need to work on is a lot shorter than it was last year at this time,
which is great. So looking toward Augusta I don’t have a big laundry list of things I
need to work on. I just need to refine
things and hope I get dialed in.”

Peter Fray

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