A
spectacular response from Crikey subscribers to our call yesterday for
nominations for our “What Were They Thinking at the Time”
or “Decisions to Haunt You to Your Political Grave” list of photo-ops gone
wrong.

Queensland Premier Peter Beattie tops the
list for donning a yellow ribbon being used by a local community group
protesting health services a few days back when he tried to take the sting out of a protest. Today’s Courier Mailreports that “the health crisis has begun to erode Premier
Peter Beattie’s authority over his party.”

Jeff
Kennett – surprise – has provided many magic moments. Your favourite seems to
be the day he garbed up in a chequered flag suit to celebrate his bagman Ron
Walker’s triumph in securing the Grand Prix for Melbourne. Another
sporting event with leaders and business identities is popular – Bob Hawke in
his white jacket with “Australia” on it in blue celebrating Bondy’s America’s
Cup win.

Anything
to do with Peter Costello and babies and breeding scares subscribers. And they’re
not sure about his outfits when he goes bush, either. While subscribers
want to see Amanda Vanstone wielding the deadly pencil.

The
Keating Government gets a gong for the 1993 “True Believers Ball,”
which celebrated Keating’s election win. And footage of Gareth Evans
and Ros Kelly getting down on the dance
floor provided great fodder for the Liberal Party’s 1996 campaign ads.

Nostalgics
fondly remember the Christopher Skase of first law officers, South Australia’s youthful Labor attorney-general
Peter Duncan, enlivening a meeting of AGs in Sydney in the seventies by wearing jeans
and a matching denim shirt.

Alan
Jones’ Zorba outfit at a Greek community function cruelled his hopes of a
political career. Andrew
Bartlett should have realised that it was unwise for any member of a political
party on the edge of a precipice to go bungy jumping.

And
Malcolm Turnbull’s Dog Blogsgives us an idea of the stunts that new technology will bring us. The Member
for Wentworth admitted to Crikey last year that Jojo, Mellie and Rusty received more hits than one of his major speeches.

Peter Fray

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Peter Fray
Editor-in-chief of Crikey

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