• “His father was a huge media mogul and he’s built it from there – he was always afraid that he’d lose the family fortune. He was always a very cautious businessman in some respects, but he’s done fantastic things. He’s been a huge figure in this country, both on the political scene and on the media scene.” – Paul Barry on ABC News

  • “James Packer, well known of course but always the son of Kerry Packer – I can tell you that he’s a tremendous fellow … He’s financially literate, he’s tough, he’s strong, he’s clever. It’s never easy to be the son of a great man, and James has had to live with that but, as I said to James, he’ll take it on and he’ll double it, quadruple it.” – Harold Mitchell, chairman of Mitchell & Partners, Australia’s largest media buyer on ABC Radio, reported by AAP
  • “James is very well prepared to run the business … PBL is very fortunate to have such a clear and long-term succession planning process in place … I know how well Kerry has prepared James for his new challenge.” – former PBL chief Peter Yates to AAP

  • Kerry Packer was the man who dragged cricket kicking and screaming into the modern media era. His World Series instituted gaudy uniforms and replaced red balls with white ones in spotlit day-night matches, to cater for television viewers. Still in his late teens when he joined the family business, Australian Consolidated Press, one of Mr Packer’s first moves after taking control was to take on the cricket establishment. “My life was sport. I was academically stupid. My method of surviving through school was sport,” he once said. – Bernard O’Riordan in The Guardian

  • The launch of World Series Cricket in 1977 stunned the sport’s establishment and heralded in a new dawn for team games which maximised thrills and enabled players to command vastly increased fees for their services. Packer secretly signed up the England captain, Tony Greig, and his Australian counterpart, Greg Chappell, as well as many other highly- regarded players, and then went on to field his own teams in his own stadiums. The move convulsed the sporting establishment and ultimately allowed him to wrest television rights to the game from the Australian Cricket Board. – Roger Maynard in The Times

  • He championed the idea of floodlit matches and introduced coloured clothing and white balls, more easily seen on screens. Television coverage was enlivened with such basic ploys as cameras being placed at each end of the grounds. These ideas have all become widespread in the 21st century. Such recent innovations as 20/20 games, introduced in the past few years in England, are a direct descendant of Packer’s ideas. The popularity of one-day matches has transformed the game. – John Goodbody in The Times