Ah, the generational shift in the Packer
family. In his Supreme Court appearance yesterday James Packer denied
bragging to One.Tel duo, Jodee Rich and Brad Keeling, that he could
influence reporting of One.Tel in PBL’s magazines and television
station.

Here’s the transcript from yesterday:

Q. There was discussion about how PBL and News might assist One.Tel with media coverage, wasn’t there?
A. I doubt that very much.

Q. Do you think it would have been improper?
A.
I can’t speak for News Corporation, but I don’t believe that I would
have represented to Mr Rich or Mr Keeling that I could influence the
way our media covered One.Tel.

Q. But you did, didn’t you?
A. Sorry?

Q. You did represent to Mr Rich and Mr Keeling that you could influence the way your media covered One.Tel, didn’t you?
A. Not to the best of my recollection.

And he said he doubted he discussed such a proposal in New York with Rupert Murdoch and son Lachlan in February 1999.

And today’s SMH has a great little yarn:

Frank Packer offered US president Richard Nixon “any use
you may like” of the Packer empire’s magazines and TV network after the
Americans resumed the bombing of Vietnam at the end of 1972.

A
document unearthed from the Nixon archives shows that Sir Frank,
Kerry’s father, sent his New York representative to the White House on
January 4, 1973 to express support for the president.

The
representative spoke with Herbert G. Klein, Nixon’s communications
director, who wrote to the president: “[Sir Frank] is disturbed at the
comments of the new Prime Minister of Australia [Gough Whitlam] and
wanted you to know that those comments were not reflective of the
majority of Australians’ feelings towards the United States.”

Mr
Klein said he had declined Sir Frank’s offer of help “at this time,”
but drafted a letter of appreciation for the president to sign.