Is CNN undergoing an
Aussie takeover? Australian reporters and anchors are popping up on the
channel all over the world – Stan Grant, Hugh Riminton and Rosemary
Church to name a few – and it’s starting to look reminiscent of the
Aussie newspaper journalists infiltrating Wapping and Fleet Street in
the 80s and 90s.

According
to a CNN insider, it’s because Aussie journos are hard-working, don’t
need their hands held, come with good English skills, and are cheap,
especially compared with the stars of US domestic networks. And for an
Australian journalist looking to work overseas, CNN offers the world,
literally, with ten fully staffed bureaux in Asia alone.

Here’s a brief run-down of some Aussies who’ve taken the CNN plunge:

Michael Holmes: The first Australian anchor for CNN, joining in April 1996, Michael Holmes is a co-anchor for Your World Today. He began his career at Perth’s Daily News, and built a career in newspapers before heading to the Nine Network.

Rosemary Church (right): Working from CNN’s Atlanta headquarters, Rosemary Church is an anchor for World News,
but she began her career in Australia working for Channel Ten and
Australia Television. She’s spent time at Parliament House, Canberra,
with the National Media Liaison Service, and has also worked as a
parliament speech writer.

Hugh Riminton (left): Based at CNN’s Hong Kong headquarters, Hugh Riminton co-anchors CNN Today, a job he took after years as the Nine Network’s London and Sydney Correspondent, and Nightline presenter.

Andrew Stevens: Co-anchor of CNN’s Hong Kong-based World News Asia program, Andrew Stevens has worked with CNBC Asia and the South China Morning Post, but started his career in business reporting with the Financial Review.

John Vause: Beginning as a TV sports reporter in his hometown of Townsville, John Vause
went on to become a correspondent for Channel Nine and Channel Seven,
before joining CNN as a correspondent based in the Jerusalem bureau.

Stan Grant:Stan Grant has worked in almost every current affairs television role in Australia, from SBS to Lateline, and of course Today Tonight. These days, Grant is keeping busy covering the whole of China, as CNN’s Beijing correspondent.

Peter Fray

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