Nine’s meanest sacking? One of the meanest sackings in the
purges at Nine in Sydney was a nice man called Ken Phillips. A former
security guard, he had moved into looking after the aging buildings and
cottages at Nine’s Willoughby complex. Phillips was also in charge of
observing all the Health and Occupational Safety laws at Nine, and he
oversaw the many corporate cars leased to executives and stars. Who’s
going to do that job now? Was sacking Ken Phillips really worth it? Or
did it just look good on the bottom line and in the PBL board room? – Glenn Dyer

Granny’s gratuitous nudity. Oh dear. The Sydney Morning Herald‘s at it again with gratuitous nudity on its website. Kit-off contestants from Big Brother in an article – in the best possible taste – on nudity on television. Perhaps we shouldn’t be encouraging you to click here. – Christian Kerr

Where have all the pages gone?
Exceeding your pagination seems to be one of the greatest crimes an
editor can be accused of at Fairfax. Andrew Jaspan was rapped over the
knuckles for it last month, and it’s a crime that seems to have spread
to the Sydney Morning Herald. Why else would the sport and business pages in the SMH lose half a page each most mornings? In Tuesday’s SMH, sport
is just three pages instead of three and a half to four as normal.
Business is just three pages with two pages of tables. The cuts in
business space are particularly noticeable on Thursdays and Fridays.
The reduction in pagination in these sections has also coincided with
fewer reports from staff, and AAP copy is turning up with increasing
regularity. –– Glenn Dyer

Is Woody going? Is The Australian’s economics editor Alan
Wood retiring, as reported in Crikey yesterday? Someone who should know
writes: “Hey, the rumour about Woody has been around for around two
months. It ain’t happening. Woody says he isn’t thinking about
retirement.”

Peter Fray

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