The Australian

leads with an industry analysis that’s found spending on water
infrastructure has plummeted in the last 20 years as state governments
have plundered the profits of water utilities and failed to reinvest in
the sector. And a juror in the Michael Jackson
trial admits that Jackson “probably has molested boys,” but that
doesn’t make him guilty of the charges presented in this particular
case.

The Sydney Morning Herald
goes with the many fathers who stand to pay less child support as part
of the biggest overhaul of custody payments in two decades. The SMH also reports that the Tax Office says the investigation into tax havens
will widen to include up to 100 wealthy clients and promoters following
raids on national law firms Deacons, Gadens, Abbott Tout and Dibbs
Barker Gosling last week. Meanwhile ICAC is investigating a WorkCover racket
in which thousands of bogus competency certificates were issued for as
little as $100 for people wanting to use dangerous equipment. And the SMH also runs this Correction: “The Sydney Morning Herald
Careers and Employment Expo begins this Friday, June 17, not August 17,
as stated in today’s special lift-out.” Not a good career and
employment move for whoever wrote the story.

In The Daily Telegraph
the proposed discount for divorced dads is front page news, but the
dads are somewhat overshadowed by a large picture of Schapelle Corby’s
flamboyant Jakarta lawyer, Hotman Paris Hutapea, who wants to call 12 witnesses to show Corby is innocent. And hopes that Queensland girl Teagan Chapman is missing Sydney child Tegan Lane have dissolved after doubts surrounding Chapman’s birth certificate were dispelled.

The Age
leads with the failed negotiations between the PM and Petro Georgiou’s
gang of four on the government’s detention policy, prompting the rebel
Liberals to go ahead with their private member’s bills in Parliament
next Monday. Education minister Brendan Nelson
continues his shake-up of the education system, writing to all
Australian universities asking for a “clear and detailed picture” of
their foreign operations, following concerns about their finances and
quality.

The Herald Sun
splashes with the contents of intimate letters between Joe and Maria
Korp which reveal the depth of the couple’s marriage troubles in the
months before the attempt on Maria’s life. Meanwhile jet-setting state ministers
will spend hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars flying overseas
this winter, with almost half the 20-member Bracks cabinet set to fly
first-class to destinations such as Japan, the US, Canada, Spain, China
and Vietnam in coming weeks. And the jury in the trial of accused
killer Mick Gatto
has retired to consider its verdict, after Gatto was charged with the
murder of Andrew “Benji” Veniamin at La Porcella restaurant in Carlton
last year.

The Courier-Mail
reports that Peter Beattie has accused the paper of harming the chances
of bringing Dr Jayant Patel back to Queensland to face the health
inquiry, following a story about secret negotiations between the
government and Dr Patel’s lawyers. The paper also reports that Patel
will be offered a one-way economy air fare and secure accommodation,
but no indemnity from prosecution, to encourage him to voluntarily
return to Queensland.

In WA, a company has come up with a new
way to draw city investors to mainstream agriculture through
share-farming and is now poised to become the biggest wheat producer in
the state next year, says The West. In Tassie, The Mercury
reveals that the former boss of the Tasmanian Farmers and Graziers
Association has asked McDonald’s Australia to explain why embattled
potato growers get a minuscule share of revenue from sales of its
famous French fries. The Advertiser
reports that the ABA has found radio station FIVEAA breached its code
of practice by vilifying Aboriginal people in comments relating to the
Redfern riots in Sydney during Bob Francis’s top-rating evening show.
And theNT News
reports that the CLP’s “name and shame’” t-shirt plan for young
offenders doing community service has been hijacked by a Darwin
clothing store, which has turned the concept into a fashion statement.