The biggest story in American politics and journalism since Watergate –
the outing of former FBI number-two Mark Felt as Deep Throat – has set
the hacks among the pigeons.

The newspaper that kept secret the identity of Deep Throat for 30 years, The Washington Post, was thrown into turmoil by the news, reports The New York Times. “Yesterday, the paper was scooped on Deep Throat’s identity by a monthly magazine.” But the Post’s
current editor found out several months ago that Felt was Deep Throat
because Woodward had told him as part of preparations for the source’s
possible death, reports Editor & Publisher.

It turns out that Vanity Fair‘s
scoop was the result of a two-year negotiation process involving 15
editors, a San Francisco lawyer, and a dummy issue of the glossy
magazine – a “protracted process that led to the magazine outscooping The Washington Post on its own story,” reports The Guardian.

“I knew that Deep Throat was Mark Felt because I figured it out,” says Carl Bernstein’s ex-wide Nora Ephron in the Huffington Post.
While Bernstein never told her, she says she worked it out then told
her children, “and they told others, and even so, years passed and
no-one really listened to any of us.”

Henry Kissinger, who was
Nixon’s national security adviser during the Watergate crisis, says he
doesn’t remember meeting Felt but considers him a “troubled man,” not a
hero. “My own view is that if you’re in a high government position or
any government position and you disagree with the government, you ought
to resign, and if you think you have seen a criminal act, you ought to
go to the prosecutor,” he says in this report.

And
literary agents are buzzing around the story, saying it could attract
an advance of more than US$1 million, although they say that depends on
how Felt’s memory is holding up at age 91, and “how skilled a
ghostwriter would be at wringing a compelling story out of 30-year-old
events,” according to The New York Times.