Dave writes:

So Graham Kennedy was gay? As I
understand it the Pope is still Catholic and Franco is still dead. Did
Hinch really think he was telling us something we didn’t already know?
And does he really think anyone cared a damn? Kennedy made us laugh
that’s all that mattered.

Mike Brown writes:
Well,
the self-confessed pedophile and smut king Derryn Hinch has already
been forced to eat his malicious slander of Graham Kennedy this
afternoon. Long-time friend Noeline Brown put Hinch straight when she
told him the King did not have AIDS. She told of a needle stick injury
in the hostel where Kennedy lived and how every staff member and
resident had to undergo a blood test.

Kennedy’s test was clear.
Brown also reminded Hinch that AIDS was and still is a notifable
disease and Kenndy’s own doctor has said his patient did not have the
disease. Hinch has now retaliated by saying he will interview one of
Kennedy’s alleged lovers Rob Astbury on air from Thailand tomorrow in
yet another attempt to rake the muck.Poor Derryn will need his Warfrin
close handy with the Corby verdict as well on his plate!

Iain Clacher, editor Queensland Pride newspaper, writes:
Derryn
Hinch’s revelation that Australia’s undisputed king of television was a
gay man will come as no surprise to many who’ve heard whisperings on
the subject for years, but it will be most welcomed by gays and
lesbians tired of being written out of history. Certainly, it’s easy to
understand that Kennedy would have wanted to keep his sexuality private
while he was alive. He was born of a pre-law reform generation whose
members suffered greatly from the prejudice of the day. Not only were
they treated as second class citizens but shunned by most, their love
declared illegal and their sense of security made impossible.

Famously,
Sir Frank Packer is said to have wanted Kennedy sacked from Channel 9 –
despite his high ratings – because he suspected Gra-Gra was gay. It was
only the lies of Kennedy’s colleagues and friends that saved his job.
Having to contend with the constant threat of blackmail or exposure, is
it any wonder Kennedy found it difficult to form a lasting romantic
relationship? And despite this, was Kennedy really as miserable in his
final years as the obituary writers insist? Being single or living
alone is not necessarily the same as being sad and lonely.

Rather,
gay and lesbian Australians should be proud that it was a gay man who
did so much to challenge the stuffy Australia of the late 1950s and
early 1960s and in doing so became a hero to many and a much loved
comic and celebrity to all walks of life. Most importantly, young gay
and lesbian people need to know that their sexuality should be no
barrier to their ambitions and that they too can become great
Australians.

Donald Allison writes:

When did
reporting facts become “splash(ing) ice cold water” over someone? This
seems to imply that only facts that are unambiguously positive should
be reported by the media. Mr Hinch’s motivation remains unclear, but it
would be difficult to properly appreciate and understand Kennedy’s life
if key facts such as this are omitted. I do not see his sexuality or
cause of his death as diminishing his life one jot. It did seem odd to
find an article on Crikey that appeared to complain about someone
spilling the beans that other media outlets had elected not to report.

Mark Platt writes:
While
reading some of your feedback I was reminded of a scene from the sitcom
Murphy Brown. Brown was sitting in a restaurant with some sleeze-bag
shock-jock when some punter approached their table and began abusing
the jock for the way he conducted himself on-air. He simply answered
with a smile “Thanks for listening”. My advice to Hinch listeners; if
you don’t like the prick. TURN HIM OFF. He only behaves the way he does
because it attracts listeners.