I
thought I’d heard it all as our switchboard lit up with calls from
around the country about our $1.25m reward for a Tasmanian Tiger. But
then I read your claim in yesterday’s newsletter that this is simply a
publicity stunt cooked up to sell more magazines. This from a man who
just made a million bucks out of wearing a seven-foot foam suit?

Sally Loane from Sydney ABC Radio writes:

Just
to correct the record – Tim Shaw did not come on air on Monday as “Tim”
at all – he told my producer he was “John” and he had a question for
Jonathan Chancellor about selling beach houses by auction. In good
faith, my producer put his call on the screen, and I took it, once
again in good faith. Once on air “John” then said “I’m not John, I’m
Tim” and persisted with the mythical question about auctions – he then
quickly changed tack. Far from being flummoxed, as you put it, I said
it might be better for Tim Shaw to take up his arguments with Jonathan
through the newspaper.

Carmel O’Loughlin writes:

Calling
Kathy Donnelly ‘the nation’s most wanton woman” is so over the top as
to be ludicrous. If she is our most wanton woman then we are so, so
boring!! The comment highlights that either Hugo wasn’t around in the
80s or was well ensconced in the ‘burbs where nothing happens and
middle class morality prevails. I found his comment superficial and
disgusting.

A subscriber writes:

Petro Georgio
was not Victorian state director of the Liberal Party when Jeff Kennett
was re-elected in 1996, as Christian Kerr wrote yesterday. Petro won
the by-election in Kooyong when Andrew Peacock retired from Parliament
in 1995. Peter Poggioli was state director for the 1996 campaign.

Christopher Brown, CEO of TTF Australia, writes:

I
have been alerted by one of your many readers that today’s edition
contains two factual errors in a piece relating to former NSW Liberal
Party State Director, Scott Morrison. Apparently, Christian Kerr’s
piece included some mention of Scott’s recent appointment “heading the
Tourism Task Force”.

For the record, Scott actually served a
fine stint as Deputy CEO of the industry’s peak lobbying forum, the
Tourism Task Force, in the late 1990s before heading to New Zealand.
However, the first error in this piece is, I believe, that the recent
appointment to which your correspondent refers is as Scott’s role as
Managing Director of Tourism Australia – the Federal Government’s
promotional agency, not TTF.

(It should also be pointed out that
Scott’s appointment was warmly welcomed by me, and the TTF, and he is
doing a great job in reforming the agency and renewing its creative and
commercial output.)

The
second error is that there is no such
business as the “Tourism Task Force” now, with this organisation
changing its name two years ago to the ‘Tourism & Transport Forum’
– recognising its changed industrial representation to include advocacy
for the transport and infrastructure finance industry, in addition to
the tourism sector.

I should say that Crikey is to be
congratulated for its policy of immediate and complete rectification of
factual errors and for the access it gives to aggrieved parties in
media dealings. It is a pity that more of your journalistic colleagues
don’t follow this professional example.

Peter Fray

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