Re: Your report The Australian’s secret redundancies plan (last Friday): All the important points in your
story
today are wrong. There is no “forced redundancy program” at The Australian and our budget was not blown out by coverage of the tsunami. There will be
no
impact on future hiring. We do not comment on individual staff.




Sometimes corrections are not correct, says Niall Clugston:

Flack/flak: This distinction is not as simple as it seems. There is ‘flack’ meaning
‘press
agent’and the word ‘flak-catcher’ which is shortened to ‘flak’, meaning someone
who
handles adverse publicity. According to the Oxford Dictionary of New Words (1991) the two words are unrelated in origin though they have
similar
meaning. Both are appropriate for Crikey’s piece yesterday.

Expat: An expatriate is someone outside the country of their birth. This
surely
applies to Wolfensohn. By the way, ‘their’ in this context is recognised
by the Concise Oxford (Tenth Edition). So they’re!

Fulsome: Christian Kerr’s comment (15 March) that this means insincere is correct,
but
the Concise Oxford also gives the meaning ‘of large size or quantity’, which reflects
the
etymology anyway!

And Rod Steed adds more flack:

Well, Crikey was correct. Flak comes from the German abbreviation for
Anti
Aircraft Artillery known these days by us and our allies as Triple A. Flak
is
from (and I hope my German is good enough!) FLieger Abwehr Kanonen,
(roughly
translated as anti aircraft canon), hence the abbreviation FLAK. It
became
common in the war for allied airmen to talk of the Flak they had had
thrown at
them, or through which they had flow. So the common term for any
adverse
instance these days, such as a bollocking from your boss is known as
Flak! (Not
Flack!).