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Home Affairs power grab rings alarm bells among spies

The Home Affairs portfolio is continuing its relentless empire-building, pressing for part-control of military intelligence — and giving spies access to a vast new trove of corporate and personal information.


Adani gets its mine, but at what cost?

After an almost 10-year battle, which has come to symbolise so much about our changing society and climate, Adani's Carmichael mine is going ahead.

Reports show trust in media has dropped — and the election is to blame

Many countries have recently seen trust in media fall following fractious elections. It’s part shooting the messenger and part clear-eyed assessment of media failings in crisis.

The making of Britain’s Donald Trump

Boris Johnson is best known for his history of lying, racism, and downright buffoonery, leading many to wonder whether Britain's next prime minister has more in common with Donald Trump than a shockingly blonde mop.

Christian political parties now face a major choice

In this changed political climate, the Christian Democratic Party can only hope to succeed by greatly expanding its appeal to non-Christians.

After the royal commission, the landscape has changed for regulators

From food safety to privacy protection to telecommunications provision, every form of regulation has stakeholders that need to rethink the way they operate in the light of the royal commission

Will Ethiopia’s Nile mega-dam lead to conflict with Egypt?

There have been concerns of a 'water war' for close to a decade, now the mega-dam is nearing completion.

We have only ourselves to blame for decades of arrogance

Crikey readers discuss whistleblower protections and the larrikin image.

The digging has started.

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Labor indicates willingness to negotiate on income tax plan

Labor indicates willingness to negotiate on income tax plan

Labor has indicated it is willing to negotiate on the Coalition's income tax plan, and Peter Dutton calls for "sensible discussion" about plans to create new espionage powers. It's the news you need to know, with Rachel Withers.

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The making of Britain’s Donald Trump

Boris Johnson is best known for his history of lying, racism, and downright buffoonery, leading many to wonder whether Britain's next prime minister has more in common with Donald Trump than a shockingly blonde mop.

Adani gets its mine, but at what cost?

After an almost 10-year battle, which has come to symbolise so much about our changing society and climate, Adani's Carmichael mine is going ahead.

After the royal commission, the landscape has changed for regulators

From food safety to privacy protection to telecommunications provision, every form of regulation has stakeholders that need to rethink the way they operate in the light of the royal commission


Meet Rex Patrick: the Senate’s warrior for transparency

Rex Patrick has a reputation for saying and revealing things that make powerful people uncomfortable.


Labor changes position again in the government’s war on scrutiny

Labor's inconsistency on oversight of security agencies has left a crucial missing link on the response to the government's attacks on those who would subject it to scrutiny.


Sorry, journalists, but this isn’t just about you

The AFP raids aren't just about journalism. Whistleblowers and many others need protection from an overly powerful executive and a Home Affairs department with a toxic agenda.

Why is it so easy for police to raid journalists?

While recent police raids of media companies have been shocking, experts say they have been a long time coming.

Australia lags behind the rest of the world on a bill of rights

Recent incursions on Australia's free press have shown once again that, without a national bill of rights, liberty is treated cheaply in Australia.

Features

They really said that?

The $12 million the ACTU spent, they might as well have gone down the racetrack and gone to the Crown casino and got a better return. It’s pretty bad.

JOHN SETKA

The embattled CFMMEU boss hits out at Labor’s election performance, telling The New Daily that his recent threats to withdraw funding is the real reason he is getting the boot.


 

Of ice and men

This week: the perils of privilege, the whitening of pot, invisible galaxies, Modi's dark victory, and what freezing does to language.

 

Black and white witness

In the Meanjin winter issue, Amy McQuire discusses the damage wrought by white witnesses on Indigenous land.


The danger of the ‘irresponsible larrikin’

The brand Katter has carefully cultivated offers a continual nudge nudge, wink wink of blokey matehood and pub banter bigotry.


Staff and students unite against the Ramsay Centre

The Ramsay Centre suffers a critical legitimacy crisis as university student groups, including academic staff, around Australia campaign against it.

Why travel advisories are handy tools in a trade war 

Are government travel advisories always about citizens' safety? There's often a bit more to it...

What hope for whistleblowers in the government’s war on scrutiny?

Whistleblowers in the public service face few good options for revealing wrongdoing. Intelligence agency officials have none.

What is the ABC for?

Crikey tries to unravel and distill some of the crucial questions we think the ABC should be asking itself in this post-Guthrie/Milne era.


A message from the editor of INQ

This week Crikey announced its new 'inquiry journalism' unit INQ. We’re looking to do things differently.


Struggling Seven West Media removed from the ASX 200

Dropping from the ASX 200 is both a natural conclusion and a sign of things to come for Seven West Media, whose share price has been sluggish for months.


So, whose flag story is it?

The Aboriginal flag isn’t the only thing allegedly stolen from Indigenous people this week.

News Corp at a crossroads following staff exodus

As multiple News Corp journos head for the exits, many wonder whether these departures are a coincidence or a coordinated exodus. 

How angry men use power in Australia

In Australia, government is used by vested interests to protect themselves. That applies as much to the security establishment as to corporate or political interests.

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