tip off

Abbott’s Closing the Gap speech might be the high point of the year

Tony Abbott’s Closing the Gap speech was one of the best of recent times, but he will have nowhere to hide if results do not improve.

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How deep to dig? Good Weekend‘s Mundine profile sparks debate

A controversial Good Weekend profile on indigenous leader Warren Mundine has re-opened a debate as old as journalism. Where does prurience end and the public interest begin?

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Mundine willing to ditch lobbying, business roles for Abbott

Peter Shergold will run the ruler over the various federally funded roles of Warren Mundine, before he takes his post as head of the Indigenous Advisory Council, Crikey has learned.

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Mind the gap: will Tony Abbott blaze a trail in indigenous affairs?

Jon Altman, a professor at ANU’s Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, decodes Tony Abbott’s claim to be the prime minister for indigenous affairs. Will he deliver?

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Public service changes make sense, but there’s a risk for PM&C

The government has changed the shape of the public service. Governance expert Stephen Bartos argues this mostly makes sense, but PM&C taking on indigenous affairs could backfire.

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Why neither major party is addressing indigenous poverty

Despit the epidemic of indigenous poverty, neither major party has a comprehensive policy to address it. Jon Altman, professor at ANU’s Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, says only the Greens have a different approach.

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Order in the House: should we have dedicated seats for Aborigines?

Just 10 of the almost 3100 questions asked in federal Parliament this term were about indigenous issues — and there’s only one indigenous MP. Bond University journalism student Tan Li Jun Sheena asks what could be done about our white-bread Parliament.

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Order in the House: the who, what and why of question time

Order, order! Bond University students dust off Hansard and discover who is asking what during parliament’s question time. The number one topic might not surprise you — but why is no one asking about indigenous affairs?

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PromiseWatch 2013: indigenous affairs and closing the gap

Take a look at how the political parties stack up on indigenous affairs. Crikey’s Andrew Crook and CPD researcher Julia Hosking trawl through the parties’ pre-election policies.

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Tips and rumours

Croc horror: Rupert visits Darwin … apartheid for indigenous legal experts … Sydney students are revolting …

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NT|

Adam Giles’ pie-in-the-sky indigenous jobs plan

Adam Giles abolished the NT’s indigenous affairs portfolio and vowed to put Aboriginal people to work. But that’s easier said than done, writes ANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research’s Jon Altman.

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Langton’s ‘racist accusation’ expunged from history

The transcript and audio of academic Marcia Langton’s recent Boyer Lectures has been altered to remove her querying whether environmentalist Tim Flannery is “provocative and racist”.

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Closing the gap? PM left ‘disappointed’ on Aboriginal welfare

Julia Gillard presented the latest report card on indigenous disadvantage today, revealing school kids are struggling, while Aboriginal employment drops. Amber Jamieson and Callum Denness report.

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NT|

Why locking up blackfellas is not the answer

Is it fair to blame violence in indigenous communities on lenient sentences for Aboriginal men? Amy McQuire criticises recent comments by Mick Gooda and proposes a different approach.

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Rudd-era indigenous truce collapses as governments collide

For a brief period, Commonwealth and state/territory governments came together in a kumbaya on indigenous affairs. With Kevin Rudd gone, that is now shifting writes ANU’s Jon Altman.

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The rise (and fall?) of Pearson, a ‘product of the times’

So Noel Pearson has feet of clay. Does the emperor have no clothes? Academic Victoria Grieves examines how the media built up the Aboriginal leader then tore him down.

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Abbott’s Cape York listening tour falls on deaf eyes

Tony Abbott spent the weekend doing his brand of a “listening tour” by rolling up his sleeves up and helping renovate a school library in the small Cape York community of Aurukun.

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NT intervention five years on: no dent in indigenous disadvantage

Outside the glare of the media spotlight, no one in government or bureaucracy would contest the view the intervention has failed to make a significant dent in Aboriginal disadvantage, write Professor Jon Altman and Dr Melinda Hinkson from the ANU.

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Crikey Blogs | LINKS|

Senator Nigel Scullion and his ‘bullshit’ Toronto Star comments

Senator Nigel Scullion appeared in a Toronto Star profile on the NT Intervention. His comments appeared ill-informed or seriously out-of-step with contemporary policy and thinking — even within his own side of politics — writes Bob Gosford.

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Re-imagining reconciliation: where to next?

This week Reconcilation Week coincided with the 20th anniversary of the Mabo decision. It’s time to ask the eternal question: where to next? writes Eugenia Flynn.

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Legal system criminalises Aborigines, says lawyer

A lawyer academic sees the legal system as another form of prejudice, saying Aborigines have been treated differently in law “from the time of the initial invasion settlement”, writes Des Ryan, of InDaily.

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A (big, blue) sign of the times for NT Intervention

On Tuesday night the Darwin City Council considered a letter from Dave Chalmers, state manager of the federal Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs’ NT state office, with the seemingly innocuous subject of “highway and community signs”.

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Can the media call indigenous Australians ‘blacks’?

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, aborigines, Indigenous Australians: it can be difficult for media organisations to know what terms are appropriate when writing stories about Australia’s first inhabitants.

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Crikey Blogs | FEDERAL|

Caring for country is also good for Aboriginal people

Aboriginal people have jurisdiction over roughly 20 percent of the country. It was hoped that such expansive land ownership would lead to successful agriculture and advance the economic wellbeing of Aboriginal Australians, writes Bradley Smith.

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Crikey Blogs | FEDERAL|

The slow death of Aboriginal Research? AIATSIS suspends research grants

Fields of research including anthropology and linguistics are under threat after research grants have been suspended at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, writes Bob Gosford.

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