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A year after Rabaa massacre, Egypt has gone from bad to worse

A year ago, hundreds of Egyptians were massacred by the police and army. Fast forward 12 months and it’s clear that was only the beginning for human rights abuses, writes Rachel Williamson, freelance journalist in Cairo.

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Egypt’s distrust of Hamas strains Palestinian ties

Could Egypt be doing more to broker a peace deal between Israel and Gazan militants? Rachel Williamson, freelance journalist in Cairo, says although Egypt used to support the Palestinian cause, its fear of Hamas has caused it to take a step back.

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Follow Friday: @courtneyr and @pressfreedom, fighting for Greste and others

When it comes to press freedom, the Peter Greste case is only the tip of the iceberg, says Courtney Radsch from the Committee to Protect Journalists.

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The US must act on Greste

Crikey readers talk Australia’s history of press freedom (or not), Peter Greste and religion in schools.

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Egypt wants to silence Peter Greste, but you can listen to him here

Australian journalist Peter Greste has been imprisoned for seven years for spreading “false news”. See for yourself the evidence on which he was convicted.

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‘A very bad day’: Greste’s shocking verdict

On-the-ground observers say Peter Greste’s Egyptian trial was bizarre and incompetent, and his seven-year prison sentence has brought international condemnation. Freelance writer Rachel Williamson reports.

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Media briefs: paying in cents … Vice selling out?… bad puns …

Vice Media is refusing to confirm or deny that it is in talks with three different potential suitors. And other media tidbits of the day…

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In isolated Egypt, foreigners get a taste of local justice

There has been international condemnation of Peter Greste’s seven-year sentence handed down by an Egyptian judge, but that hasn’t stopped the United States from sending millions of dollars in military aid.

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The Egyptian Government on why it jailed Greste

Egypt’s Office of the Public Prosecutor has provided foreign journalists with translations of two statements about the verdict of the Peter Greste case, which has seen 18 journalists and other defendants jailed for broadcasting material deemed to have “defamed Egypt”. The full statements are below. Unofficial translation of statement issued by the Egyptian Ministry of […]

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‘Tolerance and reconciliation’: Sisi outlines wish list for Egypt

Abdel Fattah al- Sisi is the latest military strongman to take over Egypt’s presidency. He has outlined a vision for change, but freelance journalist in Alexandria Vickie Smiles asks: will it change for good?

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After the songs, sweets and pyjamas: what now for Egypt with Sisi in charge?

Egypt’s new president, military strongman Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, has handily won the election, but voter turnout was much lower than expected. Are Egyptians losing faith in him? Journalist Vickie Smiles reports from Alexandria.

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‘They’re going to attack us’: Al Jazeera on the front lines of Egypt’s revolution

Al Jazeera journalists in Egypt faced particular danger reporting on the revolution. From his new book, Scott Bridges reports on one hairy encounter with protesters.

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Algeria, Egypt, Syria … the end of the Arab Spring?

Hope can only get you so far, as participants in the Arab Spring are beginning to realise.

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Egypt’s jailed journalists: Aussie behind bars paves the way for Sisi

Peter Greste’s case is far from isolated — Egypt’s regime has jailed dozens of journalists and activists. Egyptian-Australian journalist Myriam Robin says Sisi is sending a message.

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Egypt’s filmmakers throw off the chains to blaze an Oscar path

Egypt has not always been a place of artistic freedom, but Rachel Williamson, a freelance journalist in Cairo, meets some independent filmmakers who are changing all that.

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In Egypt, a vote unlikely to end the political turmoil

Yes, the Muslim Brotherhood is no longer in power in Egypt. But are things really any better and the military-backed interim government? Vickie Smiles reports from the Egyptian city of Alexandria.

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Three years on, has the Arab revolution really sprung?

Three years ago, Tunisia sparked a challenge to authoritarian government that reverberates still. But has the revolution it sparked across the Middle East delivered the democracy so many wanted?

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Egypt, still torn by political division, watches Morsi on trial

Former Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi was defiant as his trial began, claiming to be the country’s legitimate ruler. Egypt-based freelance writer Vickie Smiles reports on the chaotic proceedings.

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On the brink: where to next for troubled Egypt?

With deadly violence erupting on the streets in Egypt, is the country on the brink of civil war? Canberra-based freelance writer Farz Edraki talks to experts in Australia on the ground.

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Yeah, science!

Crikey readers have their say on Greens how-to-vote cards, science journalism and the political meanderings of Guy Rundle.

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The hope that swept away Mubarak is fading fast in Egypt

Revolution was driven in Egypt by many factors, none more so than hope. That hope is now fading fast as warring sides continue deadly protests, writes Egyptian-Australian journalist Myriam Robin.

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‘Blood for blood’: on the streets of Cairo, a dangerous zoo

Kim Wilkinson sits in her Cairo apartment while blood is spilled around her. “You feel somewhat culpable,” she reports on the unfolding Egyptian crisis.

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Bloody day in Egypt: shock and awe blows democracy away

The Muslim Brotherhood’s fury at the removal of their freely elected president has been met with fire in Egypt, in one of the bloodiest days of the movement. Vickie Smiles reports from Egypt.

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Egypt’s brief fling with democracy draws to a close

Egypt’s brief experiment with democracy appears to be drawing to a close as the army tightens its grip on politics, and some turn to terrorism.

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‘The army stole my revolution’: Egypt’s new choice — bad or worse

Some Egyptians lament what they see are only two options for the political future of the country: the military or the Muslim Brotherhood. Journalist Kim Wilkinson reports from Cairo on a third movement.

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