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Big promises but little reform in increasingly violent China

Xi Jinping, the most powerful person in China, has promised to crack down on corruption and institute real economic reform. Unfortunately, the reality on the ground shows neither is happening.

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The Chinese reform agenda: a committee to push it forward?

There’s high hopes of further economic and social reform to come from the Chinese Community Party’s 18th CCP Central Committee Third Plenum. But the big calls will probably be dodged.

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The skies clear as China changes guard, but what lies beneath?

China’s annual “Parliament” is underway and all eyes are on the country’s two new leaders. Will the new guard shift the focus from internal stability towards economic reform? You might have to wait to find out.

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When the censor writes the editorial: how China responded

In an ominous sign of what might be to come from China’s new leadership, ham-fisted censorship of a newspaper editorial has led to a strike, protests on the street and outrage online, writes Beijing-based Kway Teow.

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China and the growing global reach of state-owned media

Chinese state media has begun popping up in places around the world. William Mackenzie, a foreign journalist working for CRI in Beijing, argues the whole murky apparatus is not just Orwellian but unprecedented.

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Back off Andrea Yu: view from China

Australian “journalist” Andrea Yu has been pilloried for asking soft questions at China’s CCP Congress. Beijing-based freelance journalist Kway Teow asks if the criticism is fair.

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Lock up your ping-pong balls, Beijing to pick a new leader

Preparations are underway for China’s upcoming National Congress. Freelance journalist Kway Teow reports from Beijing on the tight security and media silence surrounding the leadership changeover.

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China and The Big Eighteen — leadership is a party affair

The outcome of China’s leadership transition is just as important to Australia’s future as the US presidential race. But the details of what exactly is taking place are not well understood. writes Paul Pennay.

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Winds of change blowing in China, but in which direction?

There is a palpable sense of unease in Beijing. Whether pending change will be cultural or cosmetic, or better or worse for China overall, isn’t certain, writes international relations postgrad Ange Fennell.

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Maley: Beijing’s inflation fight

As Chinese leaders prepare to celebrate the Chinese Communist Party’s 90th birthday this Friday, they are deeply aware that they now confront a difficult balancing act in their response to rising inflation, writes Karen Maley.

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China’s crackdown driven by economic stresses and an emboldened Left

China’s crackdown on dissent is only the culmination of a wave of repression by a government facing growing economic discontent.

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Chinese censors pull the plug on Avatar

Hollywood may love it, but the Chinese don’t. The Chinese government has decided to stop screening Avatar on the advice of the censors, who say that it may cause unrest, explains Peter Craven.

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The Guardian | ASIA-PACIFIC|

VIDEO: China’s parade in time lapse

The Guardian’s video is a beautiful slow-mo, fast-mo overview of China’s 60th anniversary parade. It’s a tribute to awe-inspiring precision. We prefer giant butterflies at the end to the tanks at the start.

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New York Times | ASIA-PACIFIC|

The man who controls Xinjiang

Communist Party Secretary Wang Lequan has run Xinjiang for 15 years with iron fist and velvet glove. He’s helped keep ethnic tensions under control by “subsuming Uighurs into a greater China”. Can it keep working?

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The week of yellow peril

This week, Australian politics was overshadowed by the sinister spectre of Chinese communism.

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The Coalition’s shameful Red Scare campaign

The Coalition is now in the throes of the biggest Red scare since the 1950s, writes Bernard Keane.

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Time to stop China digging all the way to Australia’s assets

Why on earth should Kevin Rudd allow the Chinese Government to become the biggest shareholder in Rio Tinto, which owns more than $100 billion worth of Australian resource assets? Stephen Mayne looks at the implications of the potential acquisition.

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