tip off

Articles by Jeff Sparrow

Fairfax turns on Carlton as we increasingly shoot the messenger

Here and abroad, there’s a pattern emerging where the harshest punishments are reserved for those who expose crimes rather than those who may have committed them, writes Overland editor Jeff Sparrow.

READ MORE

The dangerous essentialism of anti-Semitic and Islamophobic cartoons

In Australia, there should be no place for reactionary essentialism while we debate politics and ideas, says Overland editor Jeff Sparrow.

READ MORE

Afghanistan withdrawal deadline has lots of wriggle room

Neither Gillard nor Obama has the political capital to stare down public opposition forever.

READ MORE

Do you know what it says on the death certificate for anyone who’s executed?

The Troy Davis execution reminds us that capital punishment in the US has an intimate relationship with race, and while plenty of US liberals are against the death penalty, three times as many Americans say they strongly favour executions.

READ MORE

Why the Palestine Papers matter to the peace process

Why do al-Jazeera’s Palestine Papers matter so much? Well, because they puncture the central fictions upon which the so-called peace process has always depended.

READ MORE

The social significance of the Arizona massacre

We are now seeing a concerted attempt to obscure and confuse the meaning of the terrorist act that took place in Tucson, Arizona.

READ MORE

Our moral duty to stay in Afghanistan

Everyone knows that much of Afghanistan’s current misery can be traced back to the willingness of the Soviets and the US to fund various groups of cut-throats during the cold war. We’re doing exactly the same today.

READ MORE

The war in Afghanistan remains out of the sight out of mind

Most Australians now oppose the conflict in Afghanistan. Yet, perversely, its very unpopularity has led to less rather than more public debate about the war.

READ MORE

Afghanistan: another 30 years?

Last week, with very little fanfare, Afghanistan became the longest war in US history. Where are the mea culpas from all the experts whose earnest predictions about Afghanistan went so terribly awry?

READ MORE

War criminal to hero … a dangerous precedent

A campaign of assassination of local leaders thought to be loyal to the Taliban contains an obvious potential for human rights abuses, especially since it’s almost impossible for the media to monitor what undercover troops actually do.

READ MORE

Monckton’s Melbourne meeting: a gathering of men in Richie Benaud blazers

What’s it like to attend a Lord Monckton meeting? For the cheering crowd of Old-Australia-RSL-club climate change deniers who flocked to see him, it was like a rock concert.

READ MORE

Future Afghan government will include Taliban

Nine years of bloodshed and death, and billions upon billions of dollars spent on the Afghanistan occupation, we are facing negotiations on significantly worse terms than before the war began.

READ MORE

ASIO, not the government, calling the shots on refugees

ASIO says that five refugees from Oceanic Viking constitute a threat to national security. How can this be a healthy democratic country when a secret agency plays such a major role in a political debate, without even making its sources available?

READ MORE

Conroy’s filter: a nude horse

Stephen Conroy’s internet filter smells just like a campaign to put clothes upon the world’s animals. It will generate headlines about decency and families, but leave the fundamentals of society entirely untouched.

READ MORE

Who will claim patrimony over Tony Abbott’s ascension?

Did any of the Right-wing pundits who fostered the denialist cause ever sit down and decide that, in the wake of Howard’s defeat, the conservative movement would best counter Kevin Rudd’s steady popularity by installing the most ferociously reactionary leader the Liberal Party has ever seen?

READ MORE

Just like the Libs, the Republicans face the conundrum of courting crazies

The Republicans in the US understand too well the conundrum now facing the Liberals: You can’t run your party if you don’t heed the crazies — but you can’t run the country if you do.

READ MORE

Chilcot shines a light on Blair’s Iraq lies

A leaked contribution to the Chilcot Inquiry has revealed that Tony Blair deliberately misled parliament over his intentions in Iraq, writes Jeff Sparrow.

READ MORE

Beenie man is a product of entrenched homophobia in Jamaica

Beenie, the Jamaican DJ just dropped from the Big Day Out, may be a phenomenal talent. But he has, at various times, been openly, flagrantly — almost murderously — homophobic.

READ MORE

Capitalism cage match: Jeff Sparrow

Michael Moore aims his new movie Capitalism: A Love Story simultaneously at the head and the heart. Therein lies its biggest problem, writes Jeff Sparrow.

READ MORE

Asylum seekers: territorial security versus electoral suicide

Kevin Rudd repeatedly denounces traffickers as “the vilest form of people on the planet” but says nothing whatsoever about those governing Sri Lanka — almost as if it’s morally worse to smuggle victims away from atrocities than it is to perpetrate them in the first place.

READ MORE

Golly, the Hun should be black, white and red (faced) all over

A Melbourne toy shop has moved some of its products out of its display windows, and the Herald Sun was on hand to fan one of the oldest beat-ups in the book: “innocent children oppressed by PC killjoys”.

READ MORE

Texas Governor Rick Perry stalls investigation into an innocent man’s execution

In 2004, prison guards carried Todd Willingham into the death chamber, strapped him onto a gurney and injected him with sodium thiopental to paralyse him, pancuronium bromide to collapse his lungs, and potassium chloride to stop his heart. One problem: Willingham was probably innocent.

READ MORE

A peace prize for the president of war

Barack Obama wins a Nobel peace prize AND may escalate a war? Well, we live in post-ironical times, where we all dutifully believe six impossible things before breakfast. Like, nuclear weapons are ultimately peaceful.

READ MORE

Book industry has to accept the Kindle: it may be a bumpy ride

Australian publishers may not like it, but e-books are not going away. And with the launch of the Kindle in Australia, the industry’s going to have to adapt.

READ MORE

Flat-screen TVs, conscription and the Left: dangerous liaisons?

Given the Left-liberal orientation of most people attending the Festival of Dangerous Ideas, the Rightward slant of the topics seems distinctly odd.

READ MORE

Womens Agenda

loading...

Smart Company

loading...

StartupSmart

loading...

Property Observer

loading...