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Applying for 40 jobs? There’ll be an AppApp for that

The government’s scheme to force job-seekers to send 40 applications a month will definitely increase employment — among entrepreneurial app developers.

If the government wants to penalise dole-collecting unemployed who automate their job-seeking efforts using “online tools” rather than making “genuine efforts” to find work, they’re in for trouble. The market will provide.

Online is where job-seeking happens this century. Employers are already being barraged with job applications that are unlikely to succeed — even though they come from job-seekers who genuinely want a job — and they have been for years. I know from personal experience: when I was hiring technical staff in 2005, people using sites like Seek clicked on the “Apply” button to send their standard resume and covering letter to every job in the category they’re after. The result was hundreds of wildly inappropriate applications to wade through. These days, with almost everyone online, not just the geeks, applications can number in the thousands.

It doesn’t take job-seekers long. As The Guardian’s Nick Evershed demonstrated on Tuesday, applying for 40 jobs takes nine minutes — and he was even trying to do things properly.

Meanwhile, back in 2005, the next time I was ready. My job advert at Seek said to email a separate address for the position description and instructions and not to send a resume yet. Those who did were told: “If you’ve already sent a resume, that’s fine — although we did say not to. So you’ve already lost a point. You’ll have to catch up. Think of it as a chance to do Version 2.” The instructions said their application had to contain a certain keyword: “dolphin”. So I just rejected every application that didn’t, with a standard rejection email pointing out their mistake. Details are a factor in this, so please pay attention.

Evershed is smart and technologically literate. Maybe not every job-seeker can work as fast as he can. But it’d be easy to create an online tool so that less capable job-seekers could work just as fast, target their applications just as appropriately, and perhaps even have the whole process automated for them …

Introducing the AppApp — a smartphone app to do your job-seeking for you.

Job-seekers could simply choose the kinds of jobs they’re after from a list, answer a few questions about location and conditions, and they’re ready to go. Then, somewhere out in the cloud, a software robot trawls through the employment sites looking for matches, clicking through at a slow pace and looking for all the world like an actual human. Sites like Seek are well-structured, and the software libraries for doing this sort of “screen scraping”, as it’s called, are freely available.

Natural language processing software libraries exist too, giving programmers a head start in writing the code that tries to understand some of the niceties. Semantic and statistical methods already exist to determine how closely two texts relate — such as a CV and a job ad.

The whole thing could probably be sketched out during one of the increasingly popular weekend hackfests. The result would, of course, be an arms race. Employers would invent more elaborate tricks to sift the ocean of applications. AppApp’s creators would add more smarts to work around them, and to counter any government claims that the applications it sends aren’t appropriate.

All in all, nice work for a handful of entrepreneurial developers, but apart from that, precisely zero effect on employment.

It’s funny, really. It’s as if the government, with all its talk about “genuine effort”, actually wants job-seekers to work harder, not smarter. And with all its talk of turning up at the factory gates and the demonisation of online tools, their worldview, or that of the disgruntled employers who whinge about the young unemployed, hasn’t been updated since the Great Depression.

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  • 1
    Mike Smith
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 11:42 am | Permalink

    If the government wants to penalise dole-collecting unemployed who automate their job-seeking efforts using “online tools” rather than making “genuine efforts” to find work, they’re in for trouble. The market will provide.

    Why should automating ones efforts this way be regarded as non genuine? If it results in a job, that’s the point. And it only has to succeed once.

  • 2
    Trog Sorensen
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 12:16 pm | Permalink

    This was my idea Stilgherrian.

    You’ll be hearing from my lawyers.

  • 3
    Scott
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 12:24 pm | Permalink

    All it would require is the standard anti-bot technique of the user having to manually enter a (difficult to read) code before submission which to prevent this app from working.

    Or alternatively, there will be an increase in growth of recruitment companies, as this potential flood of applications becomes a major selling point that they will point out for new customers…i.e we will wade through the rubbish applications for you and give you the 5 best. Are you working for one Stilgherrian? :-)

    All this will mean is more time delays for job seekers, and potentially more interviews as recruitment companies become more like the job gate keepers than ever before.

    I don’t quite understand why this argument is being used to try an combat this policy. An app, and it’s subsequent countermeasures, will mainly hit job seekers.

  • 4
    Yclept
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 1:30 pm | Permalink

    As has been said before, it will all make no difference as the only real outcome the Murdoch government is after is to be able to transfer social welfare funds to corporate coffers.

  • 5
    paddy
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 2:03 pm | Permalink

    Fortunately, the Govt is on to your cunning plan Stilgherian.
    It’s just been announced that job seekers will be kicked off the dole, if they “spam” businesses looking for work.
    #Facepalm

  • 6
    Kfix
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 2:07 pm | Permalink

    Nice article Stil. And I am totally going to steal your multi-step application idea to screen applicants for the IT job I’m about to advertise, so thanks!

  • 7
    beachcomber
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 2:11 pm | Permalink

    If there is 6% unemployment, surely 6% of people will not be able to find work, no matter how amny jobs they apply for.

  • 8
    Kfix
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 2:11 pm | Permalink

    Scott @ 3

    I don’t quite understand why this argument is being used to try an combat this policy. An app, and it’s subsequent countermeasures, will mainly hit job seekers.

    I think that’s the point - the policy will encourage just such an arms race that will do nothing but make things worse for all including genuine job seekers, while doing nothing to encourage non-genuine job seekers (a much smaller cohort than the public or tabloids imagine) to make more serious efforts to join the workforce (if they are capable of so doing).

  • 9
    Kristian
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 2:21 pm | Permalink

    Dolphin

  • 10
    Dogs breakfast
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 2:25 pm | Permalink

    Stillgherrian, that’s wonderful, this is close in nature to a campaign of civil disobedience through the use of technology. As we wade forlornly through inept government mandates from all sides, it is this sort of ‘citizens revolt’ that will enable ‘the people’ to voice their opinions through actions, enabled by genuinely smart technology.

    I suspect that Scott @ 3 has missed the point. The simple work-around for that is for the app to do all the trawling and just send the link to the website for you to enter the code. So it will take a few minutes longer. These work arounds will generally be simple to create, and building the ‘work-arounds to defeat the work-arounds’ invariably takes so much more time than defeating them.

    Perhaps there is hope for democracy, not through government structures and voting and campaigning, but through technology that defeats infantile and stupid policy on the run.

    Hail the new leader.

  • 11
    tonysee
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 2:32 pm | Permalink

    Another day and another criticism filed under: ‘Why didn’t you think of that before coming up with such a dumb idea?’.

  • 12
    Brian Williams
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 3:41 pm | Permalink

    Poor old Erica Betz just can’t take a trick can he? Not content with looking and sounding like he constantly has a pole inserted where the sun don’t shine, but it would appear that the pole in question has now travelled north and skewered his brain. That’s the only logical explanation for this turd of a policy.

  • 13
    Robert Brown
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 3:57 pm | Permalink

    Why don’t they just get rid of the dole? Instead of creating a bunch of bullshit because they stopped short of what they really want to do…

  • 14
    AR
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 4:48 pm | Permalink

    So glad that I made my pile in the Stone Age and retired.
    It was the best of times, his is the worst of times - when has it ever been such a relief not to be young?

  • 15
    AR
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 4:49 pm | Permalink

    Every comment in today’s edition is being moderated - has Crikey joined the make-work job creation revolution?

  • 16
    Sharkie
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 6:57 pm | Permalink

    Gee, who knew there would be unforeseen consequences in outsourcing welfare policy to Alan Jones and a handful of lower middle class windbags who have nothing better to do than listen to 2GB morning noon and night?
    Normally its the vulnerable who get whacked policy laziness, but in this case it’s SMEs and big business. No wonder there is a rethink.

  • 17
    JohnB
    Posted Thursday, 31 July 2014 at 10:06 pm | Permalink

    This has given me my best laugh for several years.

  • 18
    CML
    Posted Friday, 1 August 2014 at 1:00 am | Permalink

    JohnB - Me too!!! Me too!!!!

    I particularly liked Brian Williams explanation for the birth of this great policy!!!!!

  • 19
    The Pav
    Posted Friday, 1 August 2014 at 4:08 pm | Permalink

    I’m still waiting for what passes as Australia’s journalists to ask the simple question ” How many dole bludgers are there actually?”

    I’m willing to bet that they wouldn’t form 10% of the community receiving benefits so this is a ridiculous carry on for such few in number

  • 20
    Mal Park
    Posted Tuesday, 5 August 2014 at 10:43 am | Permalink

    Unfortunately, there won’t be an App for that. I work in IT, with friends applying for jobs - I have noted recently that many companies for straightforward jobs such as retail, restaurant, etc now have very complex lists of questions and checklists to prevent people just applying by attaching a CV.
    Other jobs won’t be advertised - you will register as a cook/chef and an agency will provide you as casual to a company. Bad luck if you haven’t got an agent.
    So unemployed, unless they are extremely diligent and literate, skilled, etc. will be eliminated from the dole (which is the purpose). Unemployment statistics and payments will drop hooray. Charity work will increase for the less qualified poor (more work for the dole jobs to feed them.). Then like the US, there will be more prison workers, health workers, social workers, police, illegal drug dealer jobs - jobs boom !

  • 21
    AR
    Posted Tuesday, 5 August 2014 at 12:40 pm | Permalink

    MalP - as always. hookers, muscle and servants are the crux.

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