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Life in PNG: violence and brutality inside — and outside — detention

Papua New Guinea

Had Reza Berati not been killed last week in the violent clash on Manus Island — had he instead been quickly processed, found to be a refugee and resettled in Papua New Guinea — his safety could never have been guaranteed in this most violent of countries.

Papua New Guineans undoubtedly bear the highest burden of the brutality that takes place here daily. But foreigners are also targets for violence, ranging from opportunistic bag snatching and carjacking to rape, vengeance attacks and planned ambush and robbery.

Just a few months ago, PNG news sites on Facebook were flooded with images of two bodies, one with the head cut off, lying in pools of blood. The dead men, Chinese shopkeepers who ran a store in the Port Moresby suburb of Koki, were reportedly targeted by locals angered by both their prosperity amid the city’s poverty and by accusations they paid their local staff poorly.

Most foreigners avoid the Koki area entirely, fearful of being cornered by the men who cruise around the city in cars with “Baby on Board” stickers inked with the image of a Baby Glock pistol.

But in recent weeks carjackings and attacks on expats have increased, as they often do after the Christmas break, and our mobile phones beep daily with alerts about new attacks in what are considered to be the safer parts of the city.

PNG is known to be one of the most violent countries in the world, and its brutality isn’t confined to the capital of Port Moresby.

It’s estimated that at least one in three women in the country has been raped, and an argument over something trivial can escalate rapidly, with one or both parties killed or heavily wounded after tensions soar and machetes are produced.

These long bush knives are used by local people for everything from cutting the grass to carving up animals slaughtered for food, and their presence everywhere in PNG, hanging from belts or swinging casually in the hand of the person next to you on the street, is a constant reminder that things turn very nasty very quickly in this part of the world, which looks like a tropical paradise.

I am part of the community of Australian expats working in Papua New Guinea, be it on posting, in business or as consultants to Australian government programs. Those of us employed by the government receive extensive security training before moving to Port Moresby, including self-defence courses and driver training in which we experience mock carjackings and attacks. Foreigners working privately receive none of that training, unless they can source informal training in Port Moresby.

Most Australians working here, and the families who accompany them, have a great affection for this beautiful country of lush forests and soaring hills. Port Moresby is itself fringed on two sides by water, and ringed by hills dotted with vegetable gardens and signs that read “Keep Mosbi clean”. But we’re not allowed to visit the beach next to the city centre, or to walk the kilometre between our homes and the nearest supermarkets, or to shop at local markets without a security escort.

Despite stories about raskol gangs in the city, most people look busy and benign, and will smile back if you smile first. But we carry walkie-talkies in our cars, which are fitted with GPS tracking systems and emergency alarms, and our homes are bordered by walls topped with razor wire, and they are guarded by black-uniformed security teams.

The announcement by former prime minister Kevin Rudd that Labor would “stop the boats” by sending asylum seekers to PNG was met here with disbelief. The argument that it was a more compassionate and safer approach to ensure fewer deaths at sea was talked about with quiet derision.

Safer” is a word rarely used to describe anything in PNG.

The local backlash was immediate. PNG has a strong and vocal media, which were quick slam Australia for using promises of more aid to bully PNG into doing its dirty laundry.

But those who live here know that the local police are a law unto themselves, known for intimidation, standover tactics, theft, destruction of property …”

Then came the questions about resettlement for those asylum seekers found to be refugees: where would they live? Would they receive benefits that Papua New Guineans would not? In a country with high youth unemployment, would they take jobs that should go to local people? How would they integrate into PNG communities, given they come from backgrounds of violence and vendetta that made them leave their home countries? How would they get land?

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Categories: Asia-Pacific, Federal

9 Responses

Comments page: 1 |
  1. This sober expression of concern is the most chilling things I have read for a long time. One fact that stands out is that even the purported purpose of diversion to PNG - the permanent settlement of genuine refugees - hasn’t and probably won’t take place any time soon.

    1300 souls in a terrible limbo and its all our fault. On the basis of previous statistics more than 1000 of these will prove to be genuine. we are shocked by one death - how much worse is the systematic ruination of 1000 innocent lives through our inaction.

    We all must accept that this state of affairs is a result of the demonisation of asylum seekers by both recent governments. We have all allowed ourselves to be persuaded by this morally bankrupt rhetoric. The government of the day will resist any change to the convenient status quo unless we speak up.

    by Khupert the Runt on Feb 27, 2014 at 2:30 pm

  2. A rational individual’s perspective of how he/she views both community and Australian immorality. Thank you ‘anonymous’ for your insights. Offshore incarceration of boat people on doorstops of third world countries, has moved far beyond politics and border protection objectives. It is no more or less than destruction of mind and limb of detainees by Australian Govt(s) and we the Australian people.

    by graybul on Feb 27, 2014 at 5:37 pm

  3. It’s beginning to make the Malaysian solution look good, isn’t it?

    by Jill Baird on Feb 27, 2014 at 6:34 pm

  4. Meanwhile in boganland, the shoutjocks scram that the stoats have been bopped and the witch ditched, there is turmoil on the earth and all is quiescent in heaven, aka Canberra, a rooned ship station.

    by AR on Feb 27, 2014 at 9:52 pm

  5. Thank you Anonymous for your insights. Having lived for many years in PNG I was astounded by the announcement that asylum seekers would be “settled” in PNG for all the reasons you have described. Anyone with any knowledge of PNG would know that this was never a possibility.

    by Eden Wells on Feb 28, 2014 at 7:29 am

  6. Friend I know was seconded to Pt Moresby on government posting. His unit had a front door then, inside the unit, was a lockable steel cage door like a jail cell.
    Go out of a night, not on your nelly!
    In this Dodge city country we need to send Sheriff Morrision up to sort it out.

    by MJPC on Feb 28, 2014 at 10:49 am

  7. There are mistakes and there is ignorance, there is negligence and thisis down right something else. This is a conspicuous act of intent.

    by GLJ on Feb 28, 2014 at 12:19 pm

  8. Luckily Scott is a devout Christian, imagine how mean and devious he would be if he was an atheist……
    Sending him unarmed and alone on a few night patrols in PNG sounds like a wonderful idea.

    by leon knight on Feb 28, 2014 at 12:39 pm

  9. Having lived in and loved PNG the sentiments of this article are very close to my heart. PNG is a violent and scary place that is not capable of handling or absorbing asylum seekers into a complex and collective society sucj as png

    by Bobimagee on Mar 2, 2014 at 7:55 pm

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