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The Coalition’s leaked policy notes: what you found

We received plenty of responses from readers after our call for some crowdsourced analysis of the “Coalition’s Speaker’s Notes” (yes, yes, we know, the apostrophe).

To read more than a couple of pages of the document is to enter a world where nothing good of any kind has happened since November 2007, and everything bad that has happened is entirely the fault of Labor. For example, the financial crisis receives one mention (in the corporate law section), while the document lists the Coalition’s handling of the Asian financial crisis as one of its achievements.

After a while you realise the special genius it takes to see everything through such a prism. On the Productivity Commission’s aged care report, for example, the Coalition’s primary commitment on this important issue is that it “will not engage in the disgraceful sort of scare campaign that Labor mounted against the Howard government on aged care in the late 1990s”.

But there’s a reason why such documents aren’t meant to be “circulated in raw form”; they’re like political concentrate doled out to backbenchers to enable them to stay consistent with party policy. A bit like endlessly-cycling cable news services, they’re meant to be dipped into, rather than for immersing oneself in. What we ideally need is a similar document from the Labor opposition from 2006, which would have been every bit as unremittingly bleak and negative in its assessment of the Howard government. It must be very drab only seeing the world in black and white.

Here are some of the best pieces of reader analysis …

Indigenous Australians

One reader noted the absence of any “mention of support for the Federal Working on Country (Indigenous rangers) or Indigenous Protected Areas programs. Both programs have been outstandingly successful against environmental, social, economic and cultural criteria. While not perfect they are ticking all the boxes that the Coalition always claims it wants to tick. And they were invented by the Coalition … It would appear from this document that either the Coalition has forgotten that they invented these programs in the first place or they are in fact getting ready to cut their funding. Given that they represent probably less than 2% of the overall Indigenous spend that would be a shocker.”

Another reader notes “I went straight to the ‘indigenous Australians’ section after this morning reading Senator Brandis’ disgraceful politicking of not supporting the constitutional amendments unless it was introduced by Tony Abbott as prime minister. Page 99 duly states: ‘The Coalition has a proud history of seeking to secure indigenous recognition in the Constitution. Since 2007 it has been Coalition policy to hold a referendum on the addition to the Constitution of a preamble recognising indigenous Australians. We also support the repeal of obsolete racially discriminatory provisions.’”

Immigration

Charles Berger of the Australian Conservation Foundation points out “on population, the Coalition ‘recognises that Australians are looking for immediate and direct action to get our population growth under control. The Coalition will commit to the production of a White Paper on immigration that will reframe the structure and composition of Australia’s immigration Programme to address the policy challenges of sustainable population growth. This process would work in parallel with the work undertaken by the Productivity and Sustainability Commission — and will adopt as its starting point the task of achieving the Coalition’s first term population growth target of 1.4 per cent …’. The thing is, according to the ABS, Australia’s population growth rate in 2011 was 1.4%. So the Coalition will respond to Australians’ desire to ‘get population growth under control’ by maintaining the current rate of growth? Regardless of whether you think population growth is a problem or not, surely this part of the notes is internally inconsistent.”

Another reader: “Labor has strangled the 457 visa programme in red tape and has effectively locked many regional areas out of the programme. As a result, business has been frustrated and inconvenienced in its attempts to use the 457 visa programme. Publicly available 457 visa stats from 2006-07 (30 June 2007): 46 680 visas granted, 74,400 primary visa holders living onshore. Average salary is approximately $86,000. Average visa processing time: 31 days. In 2011-12 (31 May 2012): 64,560 visas granted (in 11 months), 90,280 primary visa holders living onshore. Average salary approximately $94,000. Average visa processing time: 22 days (July 2011).”

Defence

Manoora and Kanimbla were rust buckets when bought and have now been prematurely retired; the contract for Navy Super Seaprite is cancelled. As for ‘free basic health and dental care to all dependants of ADF personnel’ — the huge potential cost of this policy would see it as one of the first broken promises. There is no mention of any form of replacement for the criticised military legal system. There is no mention of CPI fixing of ex-service pensions or welfare benefits, nor any mention of rehabilitation for people either wounded or otherwise damaged on military service.”

Communications

Jamie Benaud of the NBN Myths blog dissected the chapter on broadband and communications. “The [call for a cost benefit analysis of the NBN] is a regular one. Bottom line is that you cannot do a valid CBA on a tech like the NBN, because you cannot possibly value future unknown uses for the NBN, which will inevitably be developed over the life of the network. Perhaps the best example would be to ask someone to do a CBA for the copper network, valuing only uses that were known in 1950. Essentially this means the only use that could be valued would be basic voice telephone, since telex, fax, data, internet, broadband, alarm systems, etc, had not yet been invented. So, the question is would a CBA of copper in 1950 have recommended the rollout take place, given the only known use would be basic voice?

… Far from being ignored, most of the recommendations from the NBN implementation study have been incorporated into the NBN … In fact, I couldn’t see a single recommendation from the study that has been ‘ignored’. Nice cherry-pick from Greenhill-Caliburn. They also said:

Based on our preliminary review, as more fully described in our Report, and subject to the assumptions contained in the Corporate Plan itself, Greenhill Caliburn believes that, taken as a whole, the Corporate Plan for the development of the NBN is reasonable. In general, key assumptions underlying revenue and cost projections appear to be in line with a range of available domestic and international benchmarks, and are consistent with the stated policy objectives of the Government with respect to the NBN. Accordingly, we believe that the Corporate Plan provides the Government with a reasonable basis upon which to make commercial decisions with respect to NBN Co.’”

Human rights

Another reader points out the section on human rights is “misleading”. “The terms of reference of the National Human Rights Consultation Committee were not confined to considering a charter. Indeed, any constitutionally entrenched bill of rights was expressly excluded. The Committee’s ultimate report did include a recommendation that Australia adopt a Human Rights Act, based on the ‘dialogue model’ (like the Victorian Charter). However, this recommendation was amongst many the Committee produced.

The Government did not accept the recommendation that a Human Rights Act be created, but it did not ‘abandon’ the proposal as suggested above. It accepted the recommendation that all bills be subject to a human rights compliance review, and as a result earlier this year the Human Rights (Parliamentary Scrutiny) Act 2011 commenced. All bills must now be assessed for their compatibility with human rights, also a feature of the Victorian Charter.”

They also suggested that the Coalition’s proposals for the Human Rights Commission ‘would appear to be the politicisation of the Commission and the removal of its independence’. The functions of the AHRC are focussed on upholding and promoting the rights set out in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, along with preventing discrimination. To describe this as ‘educating the Australian public of the shortcomings of liberal democratic values’ is laughable. ‘Liberal democratic values’ to any reasonable person are those in the ICCPR: equality (Art 2), right to life (Art 6), liberty (Art 9), freedom of movement (Art 12), presumption of innocence (Art 14) and so on. These principles are, to a large extent, protected by the common law in the same way as a Charter based on the ‘dialogue model’.

There are various other absurd assumptions about what the Commission really does built into these questions — essentially they assume that all human rights advocates are interested in is social change by another name, and Australia-bashing. This partisan perspective would completely undermine the good work of the Commission in previously uncontroversial areas.”

Education

Another reader noted the “Coalition apparently hasn’t got any policy on vocational education. The speakers’ notes on higher education are lamentably light. The Coalition claims: ‘Labor … are moving ahead blindly, removing limitations on number of students without providing universities with additional funds to cater for increased infrastructure and teaching needs’ (page 95). But this is wrong: the majority of capital funding for teaching was rolled into the operating grant from 1994. In 2010 the Coalition promised to cut $227 million from higher education equity funding: ‘The Coalition will save $227 million until 2013/14, by maintaining the 2010/11 ratio of funding to Support Low SES Participation as 1.687% of the Commonwealth Grants Scheme funding for each year over the forward estimates.’ This cut doesn’t appear in the Coalition’s speakers’ notes: does that mean it has been withdrawn?”

Another reader points out “[e]ssentially they are promising nothing other than to repeal the Student Services and Amenities section of the Act. It’s interesting that they are critical of the ALP for introducing the Bradley reforms without any planning or forecasting (which is frankly rubbish), but aren’t promising to re-cap the number of Commonwealth-supported places. That, combined with a glaring absence of a commitment to new money and the dreaded phrase ‘Ensure … funding is simpler, fairer and more flexible’ is a strong indicator that the current higher education funding scheme under the HESA will get a shake-up if they take government. Without seeing any details (three dot points does not a policy make) it’s hard to know where they are heading, but the simplest way would probably be to decrease the CGS-funded component of subjects and increase the student contribution cap (ie: students pay more for subjects and the government pays less). At any rate, promises to ‘restore the integrity’ of the EIF are meaningless smoke and mirrors.”

And finally a sceptical note: “I reckon the Libs have leaked the notes. How better to get your policies, framed as you want them, out into the conversation? And watch the journo0s fall for it — it will be quoted through to the election. Have you seen what Frank Luntz did for the Republicans? … In particular, hike on down to page 132 — the appendix. Words to never use.”

*Have you spotted any other anomalies or points of interest in the Coalition policy notes? Drop us a line, use the anonymous form or leave your comment below …

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  • 1
    Kevin
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 3:11 pm | Permalink

    What a giant waste of time this exercise is. I’d be certain any Party opposition to the Govt of the day, be it Commonwealth or State will have prompt sheets available to them.

    To read more than a couple of pages of the document is to enter a world where nothing good of any kind has happened since November 2007, and everything bad that has happened is entirely the fault of Labor”. You can alter the dates and name of Party in Govt mentioned and isn’t it always the case over the years? OK some-one in Coalition goofed and was careless with their copy. It’s good to let us look at it - but big deal otherwise. If the samples of reader response, in-depth analysis of brief stats, are anything to go by - ho hum! I suppose it is the Parliamentary Winter break and not so much happens to write about, time for Bernard to take a holiday!

  • 2
    green-orange
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 4:12 pm | Permalink

    There’s really not much new here.

    The rather dubious proposal to “suspend” (for how long ?) the dole for young people in areas where “there are unskilled jobs available” (says who ? will employers be forced to employ the unemployed ?) was announced about six months ago.

    Look how much the Nationals carried on about Youth Allowance. I don’t think they’d let that pass.

  • 3
    Cuppa
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 4:30 pm | Permalink

    Lazy bozos!

    Here is how commenter, Bushfire Bill, put it at another Crikey blog:

    …they have an obsession with doing no work, with using back-door methods to achieve power instead of just formulating policies and letting the people decide in the approved manner… an election, at the proper, scheduled election time.

    They have not changed their position since 2007, which is: “We are the only rightful party of government in Australia.” This attitude permeates every thing they say and do. “

  • 4
    Cuppa
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 4:31 pm | Permalink

    Source for my previous comment:

    http://blogs.crikey.com.au/pollbludger/2012/07/01/nielsen-58-42-to-coalition-3/comment-page-86/#comment-1331132

  • 5
    Michael de Angelos
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 4:34 pm | Permalink

    Agreed- no policies just opposition. The Coalition believing that is it’s role apparently.

    So the unemployed are to be published because of events out of their control in an “on your bike” fantasy. Or are they taking talking points from Today Tonight as they hunt down ‘dole bludgers’ (who it seems talk for all) and perpetuate the old Byron Bay myth of hundreds moving to an area that has only multi-million dollar houses available, and then that stern looking bloke from Centrelink comes on breathing fire and threatening retribution.

    Lord help us if Tony succeeds.

  • 6
    Seasprite
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 5:23 pm | Permalink

    It’s interesting how Malcolm Turnbull used the Leaked-Luntz-Republican-Playbook style of words that managed to fool a lot of people into thinking he wont cancel the NBN.

    Shadow Minister for Communications and Broadband Malcolm Turnbull told IT Pro firmly this week: “No, the Coalition will not cancel or roll back the NBN. The NBN will continue to roll out but we will do so in a cost-effective manner in particular in built-up areas.”

    A few posters on The Poll Bludger were suckered in.

    The Finnigans
    There is no way Malcolm will demolish the #NBN. It’s not in his DNA.

    Tom Hawkins
    NBN safe…. the first of many retreats to come.

    APPENDIX: THE 14 WORDS NEVER TO USE”

    Sounds a lot like Real Estate agent speak, don’t say “a run down termite infested rotting shack that should be bulldozed” say “A renovators delight”

    There’s a sucker born every minute and if Tony Abbott is elected those suckers will experience a bad case of Buyer’s remorse.

  • 7
    Paddy Forsayeth
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 5:44 pm | Permalink

    It’s tragic that there is almost no public discourse on policy based on available data and agreed facts. CUPPA is spot on…Abbot’s lust for power seems to be predicated on the “born to rule” mentality. The Liberal document under discussion is simply the Conservative Catechism; it doesn’t need to be correct; it simply has to be believed in and preached to all and sundry. Like religious dogma, if belief and fact coincide it’s not the intention of the author. Lies, deceit, dissembling, distortion etc are the order of the day. To paraphrase an earlier English politician “I would not suggest that T Abbot be put in a chaff bag and throw in the ocean, but I would LOVE to read about it!”

  • 8
    Gocomsys
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 6:45 pm | Permalink

    Poor Tony. Why are people so unkind to the unscrupulous and feeble minded? Not fair!

  • 9
    Patriot
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 9:26 pm | Permalink

    What is the premise of all this, Bernard? That Oppositions - the alternative government - should not oppose and challenge the merit of government policy? That is precisely the prism through which Oppositions must view the government in a healthy multi-party democracy.

  • 10
    AR
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 9:39 pm | Permalink

    If this is the concentrated wisdom fed to backbenchers, small wonder that it not meant to be generally available. To paraphrase, “the passenger on the Enfield omnibus (were there such a beast)” would start screaming outragedly if this crap should fall out if the sports section of the daily rag.
    Yet the pack of lobby fodder that is fed this crap is almost half of the House & Senate?

  • 11
    David Hand
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 10:06 pm | Permalink

    David Hand of the “Copper network myths” propaganda group is absolutely certain that the copper network was commercially viable with voice alone when introduced mid last century.

    I have absolutely no data to back this up but hey, data is clearly not needed here.

  • 12
    Patriot
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 10:25 pm | Permalink

    If the government can’t demonstrate a return on their investment in the NBN from existing applications then it isn’t an investment. It’s speculation.

  • 13
    manuel jose
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 10:26 pm | Permalink

    Trust the coalition to call them “white” papers…..
    Eh, eh???!?

  • 14
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 11:25 pm | Permalink

    Patriot
    Investment or speculation, I do not give a damn, as long as the ALP builds it and locks it in so those vandals called the Liberal Party (they lie even to their name!) cannot do the only thing they know, destroy it.

    BTW, we do not need any of that ‘patriot’ rubbish in this country. It is un-Australian.

  • 15
    John Bennetts
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 11:36 pm | Permalink

    Patriot is wrong. Opposing for its own sake is indeed NOT the main business an Opposition.

    Putting forward carefully considered and well argued policy and draft legislation and then persuading a majority of those members present and voting to support their motions is the business of all members of parliament, whether in the House of Reps or the Senate and regardless of which side of the Speaker they sit on.

    The Constitution doesn’t even mention an Opposition. The current mob are claiming some kind of higher duty - a duty to wreck the democratic processes of parliament via continual tantrum-throwing, misrepresentation and avoidance of doing that which they were each, as MP’s, elected to do. This is completely a fabrication.

    Patriot is not only morally and constitutionally wrong, but he and those who support the notion of an Opposition as a wrecker’s ball have a lot to answer for. The damage that they have already done will take years to rectify.

  • 16
    John Bennetts
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 11:37 pm | Permalink

    2nd sentence:

    Opposing for its own sake is indeed NOT the main business of an Opposition.

  • 17
    Patriot
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 11:43 pm | Permalink

    That hardly seems an inclusive, tolerant attitude to diversity. Anyone else you don’t want in this country? MusIims? Gays? Jews? Or just patriotic people?

  • 18
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 11:47 pm | Permalink

    John Bennetts
    Well said, sir.

  • 19
    Patriot
    Posted Friday, 6 July 2012 at 11:58 pm | Permalink

    John Bennetts, you stupid man, I said they should challenge the merit of government policy. Good policy is able to withstand scrutiny and the government should welcome critical analysis as an opportunity to articulate its merit. That the policies of this government are so frequently and comprehensively destroyed by the Opposition is a measure of how weak and ill-conceived they are.

  • 20
    John Bennetts
    Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 1:00 am | Permalink

    Thanks, Puff, although I am sure that no good will come of my efforts.

    Nice to see that, this evening, Turnbull made a few comments about single sex marriage/union. I’m personally a bit luke warm on this subject, but the real intention must be to differentiate MT from TA on a subject where TA has taken a strong stand.

    Perhaps there’s hope yet for an imminent change towards rational debate via a new Leader of the Opposition in the House of Representatives.

  • 21
    Patriot
    Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 10:59 am | Permalink

    My reply to John has been in moderation since last night, along with my reply to Puff’s intolerant, anti-patriot bigotry.

  • 22
    Patriot
    Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 11:00 am | Permalink

    In moderation yet again. This has become a joke.

  • 23
    Glenn Brandham
    Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 11:01 am | Permalink

    Makes me wonder how the mad monk holds onto his position as leader???

  • 24
    David Hand
    Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 11:46 am | Permalink

    That’s easy, Glenn. JB, you’re dreaming,
    Labor is gone for all money.

    Though Abbott is not my cup of tea and I prefer Turnbull, The single biggest risk for the next election is to give Labor a bit of breathing space by Liberal leadership tensions becoming the news. That’s why they’re so desperate to shut Clive Palmer up. So no one is going to challenge Abbott and he will be Australia’s prime minister after the next election. With the 2PP running at 55-45 in favour of the Coalition, why would they change?

    You need to get out of that telephone box you occupy in downtown Fitzroy with your inner urban, bendy bus fetishist, left elite mates and have a look around. Your failure to do so is proven by the fact that you even ask the question. You can actually get a latte in Parramatta or Chadstone these days.

  • 25
    Young John
    Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 1:26 pm | Permalink

    When Britain was decolonising after World War II, the hardest concept to get across to newly independent nations was that of a ‘loyal opposition’. Seems as though Australia is also struggling with this democratic principle.

  • 26
    jj mick
    Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 4:36 pm | Permalink

    You reckon that the Coalition wants to “get population back under control”? Yeh right.

    Crikey should be aware that the coalition is BUSINESS OWNED and it is business which wants a “big Australia”. The reason why business wants a big Australia is that it lives under the misunderstanding that a larger market place means more prosperity for business. Because most business people in this country have limited intelligence the business community needs to be informed that Australia has no manufacturing industry, that we need to import everything (which needs to be paid for!!) and that bringing more people in only dilutes the limited funds in the nation. Ultimately we will end up a country of impoverished people if we continue on in the present manner. Worth thinking about by those gullible folk who just go along for the ride with both sides of politics.

    As they say….a population deserves the government it gets……and I dare say the future which it inherits.

  • 27
    shepherdmarilyn
    Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 6:35 pm | Permalink

    I wonder why anyone supports either major party?

  • 28
    Owen Gary
    Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 7:15 pm | Permalink

    @ David Hand

    Whilst I have no allegiance to the Labor party, I and many others on here don’t wan’t an Australia that is looking more like it’s Conservative American counterpart each day, with 1 in 6 who have not been able to get any form of healthcare in the past and who are run by a congress which is made up of every corrupt corporate entity, which pull the strings of all politicians in that country.

    That’s what “right wing conservatives” are all about. That ideology will be extinct with the passage of time. If a fair go for everyone is a lefty attitude (bring it on)

    I think the mascots for the Lieberals in (Gina Retard & Clive motor mouth Palmer) shows just what this (big club) party stands for so gloss over it as much as you want with your media related polls as we are quite a way out from the election, & the only poll that counts is the one at the ballot box.

    As Labor catches up & you can bet your bottom dollar they will, you might find your beloved Abbott tipped in favour of Turncoat who has been involved in many a sleazy deal.

  • 29
    David Hand
    Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 9:59 pm | Permalink

    Actually Owen,
    I would quite like Labor to improve its polling and be a force at the next election. It’s good for democracy. I believed Rudd would form a competent government and was disappointed when he failed.

    It is truly amazing that a conservative catholic like Abbott gets to lead the Liberals and has a good shot at making PM. Even he didn’t believe it right up to when the votes were counted. If it had been a Labor style stitch up the margin would have been greater than one vote. As a Liberal party member, I think it is a generally democratic organisation, as demonstrated by Palmer’s failure, despite his billions, to buy a seat in parliament. He’s have had no problem on the other side. Have you seen Eddie Obeid’s mansion?

    In my view, the single most significant factor in this is the abject failure of the ALP. Hollowed out by the emaciation of local branches, run by faceless men who can parachute the likes of Thomson from Victoria into a NSW central coast seat, knifing a popular leader when the party was in front in the polls 52-48, back room deals with the Greens for the sole pupose of holding on to power and shock when the entire electorate gets pissed off with Julia for lying.

    I know you might think I’m a Liberal propagandist just putting the boot in but you have to agree surely that this lot take the cake for inteptitude and amateur politics. There’s the fracas on Australia Day, the conga line of cabinet ministers lining up to say how much they hated Kevin, the carbon tax to warm Christine milne’s heart but with virtually no positive impact on carbon emissions. The list goes on. The East timor / Malaysia fiasco, pink batts, gold plated school halls, the “slick manoevre” that landed them Peter Slipper.

    If I think for a few minutes I would think of some more but I’ll stop there. Abbott is where he is because of ameteur hour every day among the gen Y political strategists that occupy desks in the executive wing of government.

  • 30
    David Hand
    Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 10:05 pm | Permalink

    Actually Owen,
    I would quite l ike Labor to improve its poll ing and be a force at the next election. It’s good for democracy. I bel ieved Rudd would form a competent government and was disappointed when he failed.

    It is truly amazing that a conservative cathol ic like Abbott gets to lead the L iberals and has a good shot at making PM. Even he didn’t bel ieve it right up to when the votes were counted. If it had been a Labor style stitch up the margin would have been greater than one vote.

    As a L iberal party member, I think it is a generall y democratic organisation, as demonstrated by Palmer’s failure, despite his bill ions, to buy a seat in parl iament. He’d have had no problem on the other side. Have you seen Eddie Obeid’s mansion?

    In my view, the single most significant factor in this is the abject failure of the ALP. Hollowed out by the emaciation of local branches, run by faceless men who can parachute the l ikes of Thomson from Victoria into a NSW central coast seat, knifing a popular leader when the party was in front in the polls 52-48, back room deals with the Greens for the sole pupose of holding on to power and shock when the entire electorate gets pissed off with Jul ia for l ying.

    I know you might think I’m a L iberal propagandist just putting the boot in but you have to agree surel y that this lot take the cake for inteptitude and amateur pol itics. There’s the fracas on Austral ia Day, the conga l ine of cabinet ministers l ining up to say how much they h ated Kevin, the carbon tax to warm Christine Milne’s heart but with virtuall y no positive impact on carbon emissions. The l ist goes on. The East Timor / Malaysia fiasco, pink batts, gold plated school halls, the “sl ick manoevre” that landed them Peter Sl ipper.

    If I think for a few minutes I can think of some more but I’ll stop there. Abbott is where he is because of ameteur hour every day among the gen Y pol itical strategists that occupy desks in the executive wing of government.

  • 31
    Gocomsys
    Posted Sunday, 8 July 2012 at 6:28 pm | Permalink

    DAVID HAND posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 10:05 pm

    As a Li beral party member ………………..

    Does that mean a small (l) l iberal?
    Unfortunately not many on the opposition front bench at present.
    Question: Are there ANY of the current government’s many progressive reforms a “li beral party member” finds acceptable, reasonable or appropriate?

  • 32
    Gocomsys
    Posted Sunday, 8 July 2012 at 7:01 pm | Permalink

    SHEPHERDMARILYN Posted Saturday, 7 July 2012 at 6:35 pm

    I wonder why anyone supports either major party?

    I never joined a party and never will.

    BK. “After a while you realise the special genius it takes to see everything through such a (party)

    prism.”

    I think it is imperative however to support good policy when one sees it. Nothing much on the conservative side at the moment.

  • 33
    Patriot
    Posted Sunday, 8 July 2012 at 7:16 pm | Permalink

    Cassandra Wilkinson on television this morning on the selling of the carbon tax:

    they’ve tried everything except the truth, which is that it’s meant to hurt because the price signal is supposed to change behaviour”

    electricity is literacy, electricity is jobs, electricity is freedom.”

    Got that? Labor want us to have less literacy, less jobs and less freedom. And they want to make whatever’s left more expensive. That’s the point of their carbon tax. And they wonder why the party is about to be destroyed. They’re not all there, you know

  • 34
    izatso?
    Posted Sunday, 8 July 2012 at 8:14 pm | Permalink

    well, at least you still have the freedom to tie your own in a knot. when Tony gets in I’ll have no such choice, Pat, he’ll just send some nutter like you around to do the fix ….. woo hoo bet your all exited now, eh mate?

  • 35
    Arnold Cheeseman
    Posted Sunday, 8 July 2012 at 9:08 pm | Permalink

    @ David

    Looks like you need to get your HAND off it mate…

    As a Liberal party member, I think it is a generally democratic organisation,”… That one made me laugh! Maybe you should tell that to the Lib MP’s that want a conscience vote on gay marriage.

    After that HOWLER you managed to “democratically” rattle off every pathetic little Liberal party talking point you could lay your hands on… as if they were actually true! Why? Would you have to hand in your badge if you veered off message?

    but you have to agree surely that this lot take the cake for inteptitude and amateur politics.” LOL! Obviously you are unaware of the dodgy shit the Libs are pulling on Slipper and Thomson then? Yeah right… a real bunch of geniuses on that side of the aisle!

  • 36
    Owen Gary
    Posted Sunday, 8 July 2012 at 9:16 pm | Permalink

    @ David Hand

    You pay to much attention to “mainstream media drivel”

    *John Howard lied about GST, that cost us 10% on everything, far more than a pollution tax ever will, but thats ok no doubt??

    *Pink batts in peoples homes who couldn’t afford them, idea not so bad, the fact opportunists rip off the government happens, corporates do it on a daily basis.

    *The Malaysian deal will work thats why Abbotts blocking it.

    *School halls kept a lot of people in work during the worst of the financial crisis.

    *Abbott tried forming a goverment with the Greens & Independants as well!!

    *Slipper was under investigation for many years with the coalition Tony Baloney even attended his wedding but the dirty bits all covered up by the coalition at that time. I think you will find this deal was stitched up by both parties to protect the gambling industry revenue.

    You forgot to mention that Abbott wants to give billions of tax payers money to the industries causing most of the pollution, then slash the public service & servants & other things to pay for it. The public will then cop inflation on top of that again.

    All major public infrastructure is set up by Labor Governments, the Coalition sells it off to get back in surplus!!

    The coalition tried to scrap the NBN as well so they can keep us on the ole 2 paper cups & string technology.

    As to no reductions in emissions thats debateable, whats not is that we have to take the first step at some stage because the pollution in our atmosphere, oceans, rivers & food is already past an unacceptable rate & contributing to the 50% cancer rate of the population, If you believe otherwise you are already extinct.

    If money is the only thing stopping us from saving ourselves & we cant deal with it, we are a species not worth saving.

    Take a look around you we are sitting quite pretty as a nation & the government hasn’t had to send the working class into poverty to do it, perhaps this is where Abbott revisits workchoices to get the top tier of society like Gina & Clive just that little bit more.

    David your diatribe is wasted on me & others here, none of us forget how destructive a coalition Gov’t is & how freely they give billions to big business, they say you get the gov’t you deserve so be careful what you wish for.

  • 37
    Arnold Cheeseman
    Posted Sunday, 8 July 2012 at 9:22 pm | Permalink

    @ Patridiot

    “electricity is literacy, electricity is jobs, electricity is freedom.”

    And electricity is presently produced in the most rudimentary and detrimental manner possible.

    Labor want us to have less literacy, less jobs and less freedom.” I’ll bet you weren’t saying that when an ETS was Lib policy. Oh, and an ETS was originally crafted by the Republicans in the US… yeah those dirty left wing Republicans.

    Less literacy”… yeah that’s why they wasted all that stimulus on schools

    Less jobs”… oh right! That’s why unemployment has dropped to it’s lowest levels in years

    Less freedom”… oh I feel so oppressed! Please Patridiot won’t you save us all! LOL!

  • 38
    Dawn Baker
    Posted Sunday, 8 July 2012 at 9:38 pm | Permalink

    L

  • 39
    Patriot
    Posted Sunday, 8 July 2012 at 10:38 pm | Permalink

    Unemployment has increased since Labor took power. The record low was achieved under WorkChoices. An OECD report found that literacy rates are in decline. We are subject to unprecedented levels of government interference in our lives.

    It takes a special kind of fool to drink the Labor Kool-Aid and still view the world through their rose-coloured prism. Back to the cellar with you, Cheese. You need to do a bit more maturing.

  • 40
    David Hand
    Posted Sunday, 8 July 2012 at 10:48 pm | Permalink

    Arnold,

    LOL!! OMG!!

    The Liberal Party has many faults but it does allow its MPs to cross the floor and if there is a vote on gay marriage, I believe a number will cross the floor.

    Yep, pathetic Liberal Party talking points if that’s what you want to call them. I consider them a litany of a completely inept and soulless government. The Coalition leads Labor 55-45 in the 2PP polls and is headed for a landslide in spite of Abbott’s polarising character. Why is that?

    OMG!! LOL!!

  • 41
    Gocomsys
    Posted Monday, 9 July 2012 at 12:02 pm | Permalink

    The ALP (Alternative Liberal Party) at present appears to have more small (l) li berals and fewer extremists in their ranks than the LNP.
    HAND’s up who wants types like (dummy spit) Latham, (turn the boats around) Abbott or (fake email) Turnbull in a position of power?

  • 42
    AR
    Posted Monday, 9 July 2012 at 12:27 pm | Permalink

    Gocomsys - Alternative Liberal Party is wonderful, may i steal it for further use?
    The rigidity of the Sussex St machine was perfectly demonstrated over the w/e with Dastyari, GibbonFitz et al wailing about how attractive Green policies are to erstwhile, or future, Labor voters. And what solution do these men-without-navels, vat bred apparatchiks come up with? Move to the centre, brand Greens as extremist and whine about how their policies are either populist (WTF?!?) but destructive or impractical but unachievable. Were either of those noxious nostrums correct then they are saying that their lost voters are dumb & dumber whereas … I’m confused as to what they think that they think.

  • 43
    Population Stable
    Posted Monday, 9 July 2012 at 12:39 pm | Permalink

    @JJ M ICK

    Yes, this sums up the political malaise:

    “on population, the Coalition ‘recognises that Australians are looking for immediate and direct action to get our population growth under control’.”

    Policy?

    a “first term population growth target of 1.4 per cent …’.

    I.e. no change from the current rapid rate that has us on track for ‘big Australia’ - that Gillard also ‘rejected’.

    Is this not the height of arrogance?
    Do governments not represent the will of the people any more?
    Thank goodness for the Stable Population Party. We need a real choice.

  • 44
    Mack the Knife
    Posted Monday, 9 July 2012 at 1:44 pm | Permalink

    I remember a time when governments put forward legislation and oppositions embarrassed the government by putting forward sensible amendments that exposed errors or deficiencies that had been overlooked. Oppositions contributed rather than just opposed for the sake of it.

    Abbott and whoever controls the Noalition these days has brought down the calibre of our parliament to a level never imagined when we gained federation.

    This new down in the gutter style of operating is consistent now with the USA and UK conservative way of operating. Do and say anything to get elected even if it destroys the economy.

    For all those contractors and subbies or retailers lamenting the lack of contract work or sales decline, blame Abbott and co for making people feel that the economy is in ruins instead of where all sensible people know it is.

  • 45
    Gocomsys
    Posted Monday, 9 July 2012 at 4:37 pm | Permalink

    MACK THE KNIFE Posted Monday, 9 July 2012 at 1:44 pm |

    Abbott and whoever controls the Noalition these days has brought down the calibre of our

    parliament to a level never imagined when we gained federation.

    Whatever happened to small (l) liberals? How do they feel about being hijacked by extremists and sycophantic Howard era leftovers I wonder?

  • 46
    Recalcitrant.Rick
    Posted Monday, 9 July 2012 at 5:17 pm | Permalink

    Abbotts words are like the “Nigerian letter scam” of domestic politics. In the end folks, you’ll be a lot poorer. Hopefully a bit wiser, however, based on what I read here by Patriots and others , I doubt it!

  • 47
    Arnold Cheeseman
    Posted Monday, 9 July 2012 at 5:23 pm | Permalink

    @ David Handonit

    The Liberal Party has many faults but it does allow its MPs to cross the floor and if there is a vote on gay marriage, I believe a number will cross the floor.” LOL!

    Yes… LOL! If you think the Libs would EVER allow it you definitely have your hand on it.

    I consider them a litany of a completely inept and soulless government.” Bollocks… take a look at the real world and get back to me.

    Yes David… OMG.

  • 48
    Gocomsys
    Posted Monday, 9 July 2012 at 5:35 pm | Permalink

    Worth reading.
    http://newmatilda.com/2012/07/09/abbott-politburo-propaganda

  • 49
    Owen Gary
    Posted Monday, 9 July 2012 at 6:30 pm | Permalink

    The only policies the Woe-alition have put forward are in invisible ink!!

  • 50
    Arnold Cheeseman
    Posted Monday, 9 July 2012 at 6:44 pm | Permalink

    @ Patridiot

    Unemployment has increased since Labor took power.” err… perhaps you forgot about a little thing called the GFC? Labor did an outstanding job keeping unemployment as low as it did.

    Aaahh Workchoices! That masterpiece of political brilliance. Go ahead, bring that subject up as often as you like over the next year or so… you can guarantee the Libs won’t.

    We are subject to unprecedented levels of government interference in our lives.” Signs of paranoia creeping in there, Patridiot. Back to the asylum for you, for a little more rightwing indoctrination!

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