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Slipper, the staffer and the journalist: how close is too close?

The Peter Slipper affair hasn’t only raised awkward questions about what does and doesn’t constitute s-xual harassment — it’s re-opened a debate almost as old as journalism itself: how close should reporters get to their sources in their bid to break a story?

On Tuesday, the Commonwealth lodged documents in court suggesting that News Limited had been involved in an elaborate plot to destroy Slipper’s career. One four-word text allegedly sent by journalist Steve Lewis to Slipper’s accuser James Ashby — “We will get him!” —  has caused the most controversy.

That text was allegedly sent less than a fortnight before Lewis broke the Slipper story on Saturday, April 21 in News Limited’s tabloids. On the same day, Lewis wrote a comment piece saying: “In the history of Australian political crises, the allegations filed in court against Peter Slipper are among the most serious ever raised — and they rank as potentially deadly.”

Other texts tendered to the court also revealed that News helped to pay for Ashby’s accommodation costs while he was preparing his s-xual harassment claim.

Here, some background is useful. Lewis is a long-serving — and extremely well-liked — member of the Canberra press gallery. He’s not speaking publicly about his involvement in the Slipper affair because he may be summonsed to appear in court. He has been covering Slipper’s taxpayer funded spending forensically for years — long before Slipper defected from the Libs to become speaker. He’s also the journalist who, after many dealings with Treasury mole Godwin Grech, broke the 2009 “ute-gate” story that turned out to be based on a phony email.

On Tuesday, Labor frontbencher Anthony Albanese told parliament the ute-gate affair “showed that certain parts of the media were involved in the attempted sabotage of a democratically elected government”.

As for News Limited and Lewis’ involvement in the Slipper affair, he thundered: “It is very clear that we need to draw a distinction and that people in the media need to recognise whether they are reporters or participants, observers or activists. There is an important distinction between the two that has to be upheld for the sake of the integrity of the media.”

Speaking on the ABC’s The Drum program that evening, 2UE radio host John Stanley was far more forgiving:

Stanley: “As for saying we will get him, I think the thing here is you don’t put these things on the record. These are conversations, over the years, I’m sure journalists have had when they’re trying to get close to a contact or a source…”

Annabel Crabb: “So it’s alright as long as you don’t put it in writing?”

Stanley: “Yes, probably. You’re saying we’ll get him because you’re trying to empathise with someone to get a story out of them. I’m not apologising for it because we may hear more and we’re obviously going to have to hear more about how this was planned.”

The relationship between journalists and their sources has always been a vexed one — as Janet Malcolm argued in her 1990 book The Journalist and the Murderer.

Every journalist who is not too stupid or too full of himself to notice what is going on knows that what he does is morally indefensible,” Malcolm wrote. “He is a kind of confidence man, preying on people’s vanity, ignorance, or loneliness, gaining their trust and betraying them without remorse.”

Denis Muller, a former assistant editor at The Sydney Morning Herald and associate editor at The Age, tells Crikey the line between journalist and participant is often fuzzy. But he added: “This is participation in what is alleged to have been a political conspiracy to wrongly unseat a member of parliament.

We all engage in some form of social ingratiation to win people over. Of course we want to win people’s trust – the important thing is that we do it with integrity.”

The Lewis text, he says, “looks terrible because it is terrible”.

First, there is the use of plural first person — the ‘we’. That indicates that he is making common cause with his informant; that he is taking sides. He goes on to ‘get him’ — and that seems indicative of a desire to do harm. It appears that he is making covert common cause with Ashby to do harm to Slipper. There’s no other way of interpreting it — unless Mr Lewis offers another explanation,” he said.

Muller, now a professor at Melbourne University’s Centre for Advanced Journalism, says several clauses in the MEAA code of ethics appear relevant: “Use fair, honest and responsible means to obtain material”; “Do not suppress relevant available facts”; and “Disclose conflicts of interest that affect, or could be seen to affect, the accuracy, fairness or independence of your journalism”.

Muller says that exposing allegations of s-xual assault against an MP is undoubtedly in the public interest, but the proper administration of justice is equally as important. There was also little public interest, he says, in the public learning about the Slipper allegations before the case appeared in court.

I can’t see any case for the public interest being served here. If anything it’s being harmed,” he said.

Ethicist and media commentator Leslie Cannold says the reporting of the Slipper affair threatens to further undermine the public’s trust in journalism.

It’s in the public interest to know about things happening in the political sphere but the journalist has failed to disclose the political machinations behind this,” she told Crikey. “He hasn’t given us the full story … It’s part of a journalist’s job to make judgments about why people are leaking, whether they’re being used and whether the story is in the public interest.

If journalists are campaigning for the underdog — people without the power or authority to have their story told — then there’s no reason to be concerned about that. But it’s very different if a journalist is colluding with the powerful to achieve a political outcome. The two could not be more different.”

Bill Birnbauer, a former investigative reporter at The Age, says although journalists should aim for “professional detachment” from their sources this is difficult to achieve in reality.

Journalists frequently empathise or identify with their sources in order to get information in a way that makes sources believe they are on their side … ‘We will get him’ is fairly out there but journalists, all the time, give the impression that they’re onside with people.”

Birnbauer, now a professor of journalism at Monash University, added: ”At the end of the day: the question has to be: is the story in the public interest? Are you getting close to a source so that the public learns about something important or so they talk to you rather than someone else?”

Former Fairfax political correspondent Kerry-Anne Walsh, who spent 25 years in the Canberra press gallery, says she won’t make judgments on Lewis’s reporting until she hears his side of the story.

There is clearly a public interest in knowing about Peter Slipper’s expenses and any allegations against him — that definitely warrants scrutiny. But so does the subterranean warfare that started as soon as he was dragged into the speaker’s chair,” she said. I was in Parliament that day and it was clear from day one that the LNP were out to get him.”

She says press gallery journalists are under more pressure from their bosses than ever before to score scoops. ”There is a fierce competition to get a story and it’s not always healthy. You’ve got to show to your proprietor that you are value for money,” she said.

In the federal court yesterday, Slipper’s counsel David Chin agreed to give Lewis until July 6 to comply with a subpoena to produce all text messages, documents, phone records, emails and memos sent between him and Ashby between February and April 2012.

Lewis and Campbell Reid, News Limited’s editorial director, declined to comment to Crikey.

In a written statement a spokesperson said, “News Limited notes reports concerning one of our senior journalists Mr Steve Lewis.  News Limited stands by its journalists undertaking investigative reporting into matters of public interest.  The matters in question cover serious allegations against one of Australia’s most senior politicians – the Speaker of our national Parliament.  It is entirely legitimate that news organisations should investigate and report on such allegations.”

30
  • 1
    Stevo the Working Twistie
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 1:47 pm | Permalink

    This seems to be all about the ethics and motives of an individual “journalist” (for want of a better word), but really it’s about the ethics and motives of an entire media organisation. Limited News has shown over and over again that it will do anything in its power to influence politics and opinion in ways that are to its benefit. The actions of an individual may not be directly ordered or supported by management, but they will almost certainly by encouraged by the organisational culture.

  • 2
    klewso
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 2:44 pm | Permalink

    Annabel Crabb doesn’t know how “journalists/ism” work/s?

  • 3
    klewso
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 2:48 pm | Permalink

    Let’s face it too many “political correspondents” have willingly become “co-respondents” - colouring their own reporting with their own prejudices.

  • 4
    klewso
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 2:53 pm | Permalink

    Are “editors” “journalists” too?

  • 5
    cairns50
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

    am i reading you correct mr nott ?

    you state mr lewis is one of the best like journos in the canberra press gallery

    then you go on to state that he was the reporter that broke the godwin grench affair about which mr grench send false emails and told lies concerning kevin rudd in what was an attempt to destroy the reputation of mr rudd by stating that he had acted corruptlly regarding the use of a car for electoral and political reasons

    mr grench was found to have lied about everything he wrote and said about mr rudd

    now you report that mr lewis has been deeply involved with mr ashby in an attempt to destroy mr slippers reputation

    and once again what mr lewis has been reporting appears to be nothing but lies

    but you say mr lewis is one of the best like journos in the canberra press gallery

    which begs me to ask the question, does a reporter have to be a liar to be well liked in the canberra press gallery ? and is that the sort of behaviour that enables a reporter to be well liked by his peers working in the same enviroment ?

  • 6
    Edward James
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

    The fact that our governments and politicians still continue to indulge in a process famously identified by a long gone Queensland Premier as feeding the chooks, has not changed. What happens has a lot to do with the way Steve Lewis story about Peter Slipper’s accuser James Ashby unfolded. Journalist with some skill as word smiths often get poached to move away from newspapers and exercise their talents as word smiths / media officers and spin doctors on behalf of the dark side of politics. I have had some experience with TV and print journalist, I know many of them are not that “nice”, perhaps because they are about improving their employment position not yours in terms of exposing what you may think is a newsworthy story, perhaps about wrongful deaths of five people. In fact they have a lot in common with those dodgy politicians so many of us have met! Edward James 0243419140

  • 7
    zut alors
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

    I hope that Ashby and Lewis will end up reaping precisely what they have sown.

  • 8
    Edward James
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 3:41 pm | Permalink

    @ KLEWSO Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 2:53 pm | Permalink Are “editors” “journalists” too? I often wonder KLEWSO when I read some of the stuff editors support if they understand, what Muller, now a professor at Melbourne University’s Centre for Advanced Journalism, says about several clauses in the MEAA code of ethics: “Use fair, honest and responsible means to obtain material”; “Do not suppress relevant available facts”; and “Disclose conflicts of interest that affect, or could be seen to affect, the accuracy, fairness or independence of your journalism”. It is worth noting I continue to identify a certain paper as a promulgator of lies. And those “in the media” around that paper have gone deaf dumb and blind. Edward James 0243419140

  • 9
    Michael de Angelos
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 4:36 pm | Permalink

    Ethicist and media commentator Leslie Cannold says the reporting of the Slipper affair threatens to further undermine the public’s trust in journalism.”

    The understatement of the year.

    Edward James is right and I’ve known many hacks and I wouldn’t trust them with your wife.
    Most are desperate opportunists working in an desperate industry where you are only as good as your last ‘scoop’. The whole business of news reporting now breeds exageration and contempt for the truth.

    There are few now left with ethics.

    Where is the apology from Lewis for his absurd Utegate beat-up?.
    They do it because they can get away with it and hope the public has short memories.

    Five years ago this bunch were screeching that on Jersey island a former children’s home was littered with murdered kiddies bodies yet it was hogwash.

    Never an apology-never an explanation. They think they can treat us as mugs and we won’t notice.

  • 10
    eric
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 5:21 pm | Permalink

    Michael de Angelos
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 4:36 pm | Permalink

    Never an apology-never an explanation. They think they can treat us as mugs and we won’t notice”.

    Unfortunately most of their mug readers only know what they are told and believe most of the outright lies and BS from News Ltd.

    I just hope that by splitting the company Murdoch loses some of his badly performing papers down the gurgler.

  • 11
    klewso
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 5:53 pm | Permalink

    The more you hear journalists talk (or not, especially) of other journalists - no matter what they do, they’ll defend them or refuse to condemn them (especially against the stands they’ll take against “rubes” when they transgress similar boundaries), they’ll have to do something pretty grubby to earn reproof - the more you wonder is there some sort of “society” to which they belong that over-rides concerns for other matters.

  • 12
    Harry1951
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 6:54 pm | Permalink

    Off-topic maybe but Murdoch splitting his evil empire into two, can I suggest the names of the separated entities:

    Limited News
    and
    Corpse

  • 13
    kolah
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 7:55 pm | Permalink

    This is the extremely likeable Lewis who wrote the completely false front page article on Monday denouncing the Government for stealing water and fruit sweets from the mouths of babes, well, students visiting Parliament House.

    The long-serving Lewis who forensically pursued Godwin Grech’s lies that the then Prime Minister of Australia had behaved corruptly.

    The Lewis who is a senior journalist for the second least trusted source of news in Australia.

    The seriousness of the behaviour of Ashby-Brough-Lewis cannot be over-stated. This is far from simply being about Slipper. It is an attempt to undermine our government.

    I am sick to the back teeth of “journalists” like Lewis. Crikey needs to hold them strongly to account. If not, who will?

  • 14
    Mark from Melbourne
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 8:38 pm | Permalink

    Lewis must be pretty close to 3 strikes and your out?

  • 15
    Captain Planet
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 10:13 pm | Permalink

    I am displeased to announce (again) that we have hit the bottom of the barrel.
    We are now officially a country under government by grubby, partisan media smear tactics.
    The lack of planning and investigative rigour in these examples is illuminating. It is clear that our “informers” in the MSM no longer even care that their lies will be discovered:- by the time the truth comes out, the damage is done.

    It is the accusation of gross impropriety that does the damage. The truth does not matter, even when it is exposed shortly thereafter: The reputation of the accused is tarnished by the fact of the accusation, not redeemed by the baselessness of said accusation.

  • 16
    Captain Planet
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 10:14 pm | Permalink

    Let’s try that with Anti - Moderation Modifications:-

    I am displeased to announce (again) that we have hit the bottom of the barrel.
    We are now officially a country under government by grubby, partisan media smear tactics.
    The lack of planning and investigative rigour in these examples is illuminating. It is clear that our “informers” in the MSM no longer even care that their l13s will be discovered:- by the time the truth comes out, the damage is done.

    It is the accusation of gross impropriety that does the damage. The truth does not matter, even when it is exposed shortly thereafter: The reputation of the accused is tarnished by the fact of the accusation, not redeemed by the baselessness of said accusation.

  • 17
    Captain Planet
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 10:15 pm | Permalink

    Ah. Better.

  • 18
    klewso
    Posted Thursday, 28 June 2012 at 11:33 pm | Permalink

    The result of a media (market) dominated by an overt partisan political player, bent on installing conservative government by way of a publicity management scheme influencing voter perception.

  • 19
    MJPC
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 7:41 am | Permalink

    Cairns50 has said it all. I believe the Canberra Press Gallery seem to believe they are some type of determinate of who should govern and who should not. Rather than report the news, they want to be part of makin the news.
    Lewis hiding behind some warped statement of the public needing to know falls short when his reporting plainly serves a partisan political purpose.
    If Lewis wants to make the law become a politician, if he wants to report the law then his tawdry tabloids are there for those lies.
    Attempting to influence a change of government by shady background dealings with LNP hopefuls is not a basis for an independant press.
    I wonder what the Press Council will do when it all comes out in court, will Lewis be chastised?
    By the way, does anyone know what happened to Godwin Grech? Let’s hear his opinion.

  • 20
    Edward James
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 8:21 am | Permalink

    Australian media is dominated by political players! Consider the amount of ratepayers money our councils pay for advertising. We the people can make a difference to the way we are governed, all it takes is for us to realise that fact. Then resolve to act with each other in common purpose. Are there any other activist our there who have one so far as to buy pages in their local papers, to publish information / news which those toadies to government in the filing main stream point blank refuses to publish? Edward James

  • 21
    Edward James
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 8:26 am | Permalink

    Australian media is dominated by political players! Consider the amount of ratepayers money our councils pay for advertising. We the people can make a difference to the way we are governed, all it takes is for us to realise that fact! Then we need to resolve to act with each other in common purpose. Are there any other activist our there who have gone so far as to buy pages in their local papers, so they may publish information / news which those toadies to government in the failing main stream media point blank refuse to publish? Edward James

  • 22
    cairns50
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 8:34 am | Permalink

    thats my point kolah, here we have an article written by a CRIKEY JOURNO and it starts out by telling us how well liked steve lewis is

    if thats not starting to massage crikey readers for whats said in the rest of the article then i dont know what is ?

    thanks for mentioning his must recent lies against the government regarding that no fruit and snacks would be available to school children at parliament house, which he published even after being told by an official that it was not going to happen

    but dont forget this serial liar who poses as a journalist is well liked

  • 23
    Edward James
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 8:40 am | Permalink

    Someone wrote a lie will be half way around the world before the truth gets its boots on. We know politicians and their supporters have a lot in common with the three wise monkeys. It remains the job of the we the peoples to hold those whom we have given our votes to in trust and the main stream media to account. Crikey is one of the players in a box position to follow up on much of the information they are given by their paid subscribers and others looking for help, because of Stephens reputation for blowing the whistle. Time to step up Crikey.com! I subscribe because I dream Crikey.com will fire up like it used too! Edward James 0243419140

  • 24
    Mack the Knife
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 8:51 am | Permalink

    On the face of it the ‘getting’ of Slipper was a well orchestrated and planned event, funded by the H R Nicholls society.

    Be nice to be a fly on the wall at their meetings. I wonder what plan B is?

  • 25
    Edward James
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 8:56 am | Permalink

    @ Mack the knife . do you think Juliar has embarrassed herself by agreeing to pay others to do what the federal government could not? Edward James

  • 26
    Edward James
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 9:01 am | Permalink

    Paying others with our Australian taxes, to do the job which we elected Labor to do. Federal government has failed the Australian peoples. Edward James

  • 27
    klewso
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 9:20 am | Permalink

    As I see it, our “body politick” consists of two distinct bodies – we the general public voting, and those we the people elect to represent us, to govern us, for us. The two connected by a conduit that is the Public Service (however there are quite a lot of “punctures/lobbyists” that will by-pass this process, not always to the “greater good”).
    Those two main bodies are otherwise separated by a semi-permeable membrane through which information passes called “the media” - they are neither of us nor of “them”, but keep both sides informed of what is going on respectively. However it seems some of that media is more prepared to select what they will represent to the other side – be it what certain politicians are doing (“ruperted” along party lines, playing party games), or what constitutes “public interest/concern”, as long as it conforms to their (political) narrative and agenda? In the way they edit and frame the “news” to views – so much easier when they own most of that market, to influence others.

    Mack how could that be? Wasn’t that the “dance hall” where Kathy Jackson did her “Can-can”, while Reith danced in the chorus line?

  • 28
    Edward James
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 9:36 am | Permalink

    @ Klewso. We the people from time to time at various ballots Local State and Nationally continue (rather stupidly perhaps) to give our votes in trust to political allsorts who collectively insist, because we continue to let them betray that trust. Edward James

  • 29
    Peter Ormonde
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 9:42 am | Permalink

    We”???? “We will get him.” Says it all really - from pundit to player , and always a paddler in smear and scandal…. a co-conspirator and conniver. Journalist? Not bloody likely.

  • 30
    Edward James
    Posted Friday, 29 June 2012 at 9:51 am | Permalink

    Perhaps the people who bought Crikey.com may be unhappy with me asserting this. Crikey should get back to its grass roots there are enough bought and paid for media outlets which run on “tracks” we the peoples need a road less traveled! Edward James 023419140

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